Older isn't always better

  • Article by: NANCY ROSE , Contributing Writer
  • Updated: July 6, 2010 - 3:49 PM

Heirlooms are hot commodities in many gardens, but these tried-and-true plants, while popular, aren't always the best choice.

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dontletmegetJul. 7, 10 1:34 PM

you don't have to buy seeds anymore. Just save some.

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someoneeelseJul. 7, 10 1:48 PM

Not a good article. Heirloom veggies should be pursued whenever modern hybrids have been bred for thinks like color and appearance and characteristics such as taste and nutritional value have been decreased. Carrots, Corn, and Tomatoes being probably the most egregious examples. Vegetables that do not come in limited range of colors and appearance such as these will not benefit from heirloom varieties. An apple can be bred for taste because there are so many variations. Vegetables that are naturally restrictive in appearance and color, such as peas, will only have the focus of modern breeding be on disease reduction, cultivation and taste. The author's a horticulturalist, shouldn't that be the kind of information that should be in the article?

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chunstigerJul. 7, 10 8:09 PM

I prefer the GMO fruits and vegetables from Monsanto. You know, the ones that taste like cardboard and have no nutritional value.

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