Education reform: The race is over, but this is no time to rest

  • Article by: ROBERT H. BRUININKS and EARL H. POTTER; CHARLIE WEAVER: and BERNADEIA JOHNSON and VALERIA SILVA
  • Updated: May 23, 2010 - 8:27 PM

Three views on education reform in Minnesota and beyond.

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  • Comments

  • Results per page:
inrealityMay. 23, 10 8:39 PM

People currently purchase college educations, cars, homes, insurance, vacations, groceries, etc. So, they should also purchase their K-12 education. Government needs to get out of the education supply business and all schools should be private. Parents should shop for a K-12 education just like they shop for anything else. This would require a change in our tax system but that is something that also needs radical reform and simplified. For those families that would still need a subsidy the government could provide that but the government wouldn't provide the actual school. This is no different than food subsidies that the government gives today, the government gives the subsidy but they don't run the grocery stores. We simply need to inject some individual liberty & economic freedom into the equation. We need less government involvement in our lives. We could dramatically lower the cost of education, increase the quality & choices and give real choice to parents along with a better future for "the children" with these reforms. God Bless America.

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editor25May. 24, 10 6:42 AM

That you would run these op-eds focusing only on teachers, as if they were the bane of education. What a joke. Education will not improve if the only input you focus on is teachers. More sophistry from the Strib. It DOES affirm the narrative pushed by this paper for a decade or more, but it will result in worse educations for our children. It will advance Republican power and privatization however, so mission accomplished!

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manitoulinMay. 24, 10 7:03 AM

This guy had a reputation for preparing kids for college over the decade and a half in our commnuity. Now at the end of my oldest's junior year, this happens. That is the problem folks - lack of money.

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jackpine091May. 24, 10 7:10 AM

has always been and will always be administration. Teachers only affect their classrooms, but administrators impact entire schools and districts. There are too many administrators, at district offices, taking too much money out of the classroom. They send down their mandates from the top that do more harm than good, and prevent teachers from teaching your kids.

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jackpine091May. 24, 10 7:14 AM

Principals need to deal effectively with disruptive/ dangerous students. As a society, we need to find a more effective way to deal with these kids. Dumping them into classes where kids want to learn only interferes with the educational process. Until you get rid of the thousands of in-school drop out in Minnesota schools ($9000 a piece), we will continue our "race to the bottom."

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joeeeeeeMay. 24, 10 7:35 AM

focus on one aspect of problems that stem from multiple causes. Bashing the teachers is a political cause not a solution to anything wrong with our educational system. If you have incompetent teachers in your district then you have a management problem-deal with that and your incompetent teachers don't exist. If we allow parents to check out of participating in their kids educations then we are doomed to never close anyuthing let alone the education achievement gap. parents and kids need to sign contracts to perform their side of the bargain and teachers and management will do the rest. Still, only in a utopia will all succeed.

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wbgleasonMay. 24, 10 8:19 AM

It would take a rather long essay to address the many questionable arguments made here by those high and low on the academic totem pole. But the U's claim to "guarantee" that their products will somehow solve all problems is absurd on its face. And how can you attract good people to the teaching profession when prospects are so bleak for those already in the job market. Many outstanding teachers are being dumped, not because of performance, but because of lack of money. And the performance of some groups will suffer as long as children come to school hungry and leave to a bad environment. Let us hope that we come to our collective senses in the next few years.

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mikebrenMay. 24, 10 8:42 AM

Minnesota has more school districts then California a state with 40 million people. We need to streamline and consolidate so we can eliminate the administrative overhead. People are selfish and feel every town needs a school to identify it as a viable community.....

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hillampMay. 24, 10 9:19 AM

I work in the system and am tired of all the teacher and union bashing that is in vogue right now. People need to read the new book by Diane Ravitch- The Death and Life of the Great American School System. It gives a great history of how we got to the place we are in and how businesses and corporations have changed education- for the worse. I work in early ed and see huge gaps in motivation and knowledge. How in the world can we be held accountable for problems that have perpetuated in our society?

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lvanonymousMay. 24, 10 9:58 AM

If many good teachers are 'dumped' because of lack of money, why all the resistance to performance-based measures with regards to determining what teachers should be working?

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