Zipnosis: Online medicine in a hurry

  • Article by: WENDY LEE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: May 19, 2010 - 5:29 AM

MinuteClinic entrepreneur Rick Krieger's new venture, Zipnosis, lets patients get diagnoses online, for $25. The company started a pilot program at Park Nicollet this month.

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bottomlineMay. 18, 1011:34 PM

Of nameless, faceless medicine.

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hswcbMay. 19, 10 5:33 AM

Hope there are no prescriptions given out this way for the pain killers that so many are addicted to.

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olszewskipMay. 19, 10 6:16 AM

Out of fear of nationalized health care, we opted to move to internet-based health care. I think the next step should be a virtual hospital as one of IMVU chat rooms.

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pablolMay. 19, 10 6:44 AM

I expect that the right wing fringe will have a field day just imaging what this all means. For the rest of us, this is nothing short of brilliant. This will provide care where none exists (for the "I don't have a hundred dollars to go to the doctor for 5 minutes!" crowd) For those people who fear change and innovation, I'd suggest that you go to your doctor and seriously discuss this. In person. Congratulations, Zipnosis and Park Nicollet.

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wpareeneMay. 19, 10 7:35 AM

Our "insurance" has a $2000 per person deductible so I suffered in pain rather than pay a $195 bill to see my doctor for sinus infection. Last week I ran across a similar service that cost me $35 for a telephone consultation with a doctor (or online web cam if I had prefered). Doc called in antibiotics. I'm starting to feel better. I would rather have seen my regular doc but who can afford $195 out of pocket?

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langton4May. 19, 10 7:46 AM

Can outsourcing healthcare to another country be far behind?

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olszewskipMay. 19, 10 8:16 AM

In Sweden, there is a different system aimed at reducing congestion in doctor's offices - it's called Vardcentral. These are neighborhood walk-in clinics staffed with nurses. These nurses are the buffer between patients and physicians - if someone with the flu comes in, they give advice and send the person home to rest - no doctor is needed. They check symptoms. They order tests to exclude bacterial infections. They interview to understand the medical history and co- and pre-existing conditions. If there is anything unusual, they immediately schedule an appointment with a physician. In their education, it is emphasized that any time they see something even slightly suspicious, they should send a patient to a doctor. As a result of this approach, only 50-60% of patients have to see a doctor. And for those who will scream that people are probably being "murdered by unqualified staff this way", it should be reminded that Swedes are one of the healthiest nations, their life expectancy is one of the longest in the world, infant mortality lowest, etc, etc. Their statistics are much better than ours also when it comes to health care satisfaction measures, including waiting times and quality of care. And all this happens in the "communist" system of almost completely nationalized health care where private hospitals are rarity.

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USukMay. 19, 10 8:17 AM

Looking forward to a time when my doctor is in Pakistan working from a bank of computers in a internet sweatshop. Just like the customer service lines.

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mahoneytMay. 19, 10 9:24 AM

I get the "grunge" every Fall. Last year I called the doc's office to get an antibiotic. Nope, had to make an appointment and miss work. Ok, fine. Hey, doc, I'm coughing up the green stuff and feeling crummy. Doc says, no big deal, no antibiotics necessary. One month later, I still have the grunge, so I see a differnet doc. Finally, antibiotics. All better in a week and two $35.00 co-pays later. Yep, these clinics sure know how to make their bucks. I'm all for simple treatments for simple health issues.

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rebeltoadyMay. 19, 10 9:54 AM

Doctors have a inflated opinion of their own value in the healthcare system. 99.9999% of them would add nothing to a first visit diagnosis. This is a good step in the right direction.

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