A Fresh Start

  • Article by: DAVID JOLES , Star Tribune
  • Updated: May 11, 2010 - 8:25 AM

On an infant mattress in a barren bedroom, Brittni Jones, 18, and her daughter Alissa, 21 months, seemed to marvel at their good fortune. They were no longer homeless.

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joethplumberMay. 11, 1012:13 PM

in all of this? I'm tired of paying for peoples kids who are to irresponsible to provide for their own childern. QUIT Having kids if you cannot afford them, I have never had any because I could not afford them....now I have to pay for everybody elses

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graya12May. 11, 1012:29 PM

To the reporter: I'd like to help Brittni and her daughter out with some furniture and other household items. Can we help somehow?

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beckymnMay. 11, 10 1:01 PM

Forward my email to this person. I have children nearly the same age and other household items that I would be more than happy to donate.

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patriciatMay. 11, 10 1:19 PM

I guess you have never made any mistakes. Kudos for you. What some people don't understand (based on your comment, you included) is that if we don't invest in people, it will come back to haunt us in ways that are even more expensive, i.e. drugs, violence, and crime resulting in more expensive care, i.e. court ordered treatment (who do think pays for that, bucko?), prison time (which doesn't come cheap). I would rather invest money this way than spend it paying for someone to stay at the barbed-wire Hilton. BTW, welfare, traditional welfare where we give rent subsidies and financial assistance, is a fraction of the health and human services budget. Most of the welfare budget goes to support grandma and grandpa in the nursing home, and people with disabilities. Just ask HHS or your state senator for the facts. When you complain about welfare, you are complaining about people who spent their lives taking care of us and have nothing left to take care of themselves, or people who through no fault of their own are unable to care for themselves. Many of the people who need this help are the most vulnerable of our society. Shame on you for turning your back on them.

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ceemarieMay. 11, 10 2:32 PM

It saddens to me to see a someone who became a parent at 16 struggle so much, but that is the reality of it, 16 year olds are not meant to be parents. I am hoping that with a home she can focus on getting the skills needed to become a productive citizen and to be able to take care of her child on her own. We all need help from time to time and to have a roof over our heads at night can make all the different in our outlook on life. I hope that she gets on her feet and passes her good fortune on to others when she is able.

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sanborn40May. 11, 10 2:57 PM

Is there a way to donate furniture or other household items to this person?

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patriciatMay. 11, 10 3:46 PM

What you believe and what is the truth, can be and are two different things. I just hope you don't need the help you are so unwilling to give now later in life.

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justin117May. 11, 10 4:22 PM

When I donate things I want people to be able to get them and not have to buy them. There is a foundation called "Bridges or Bridging". I don't know much about it but they help one time with furniture and kitchen items to homeless and people moving into an apartment with nothing but clothes.

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KeKeCoCoMay. 11, 10 6:16 PM

While it's true what you say, do you know this girl's whole story? No? Neither do I. She may have grown up w/o a dad, she may have been sexually abused as a child, she may have a mom who is mentally ill, the child's father may have beat or tried to kill her, or it's possible she may be contending with mental and/or physical health issues of her own. Maybe all of the above. While it doesn't excuse bad choices, it does make it easier to understand why people do what they do. Please think before you speak and say things that are helpful not harmful. Not too many people WANT to be a parent at 16 and, sadly, she will almost positively struggle for the rest of her life now as a result...esp. when she encounters people who don't understand or really care and just want to shake their fingers at her. (I know because I was pregnant at 16 and have lived the struggle.) I respect the fact that she's trying to take care of her kid. A hand up may be all she needs. Let's all show a little more love and concern and see what a difference that can make.

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dakmarkMay. 11, 10 6:54 PM

Why does the negligent father not pay for an apartment? This baby was born when the mom was 16. How old was the father? If he was a minor why aren't his parents paying?

I know - I know - you liberals will tell us it takes a village to raise a child - we should all pay. unfortunately, the village is bankrupt - time for people to take personal responsibility.

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