Future Ed: Remote learning, 3D screens

  • Article by: Star Tribune staff writer
  • Updated: January 26, 2010 - 9:12 AM

Twenty-five years from now, technology might allow students to learn 24/7 and go to a school building only once or twice a week.

  • 19
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
inrealityJan. 25, 10 7:17 PM

parents and children we would get government out of the education process and develop a robust private education market. Government could still help with subsidies for some families but those families would buy a private market education. Parents would have real choice and their would be true competition in the education which would lower prices and increase the educational product. Parents could choose from hi-tech schools with sports teams to basic education schools. Schools would cater to parents and technology would be implemented in the schools as demand increased and at a much lower cost than any government school could do it for. We need more freedom in education. We need stronger family budgets through a more efficient education system and lower taxes. We should embrace freedom. Our schools should embrace freedom and they should be promoting it and educating children about it. God Bless America.

3
14
joriloJan. 25, 1010:48 PM

Great ideals, all of which require access to high speed data networks. Create/fund/subsidize/profit from the access, and ideas like this can take off.

9
1
HealthcrusaderJan. 25, 1010:56 PM

Only Big Brother could watch over them ;)

8
1
purplepigJan. 26, 10 1:51 AM

The broadband jorilo wants could be funded by the vast savings closing the schools would provide.

5
14
k53388Jan. 26, 10 6:50 AM

In 25 years? U.S. education is already behind 16 to 25 nations, depending on the stats that are available, in terms of quality, results and achievement. 25 years from now,if we continue our draconian practices, we will find ourselves 50 years behind and unable to catch up. South Korea has it right. They REQUIRE results from their educators and students and, no surprise, PARENTS. They realize that educators are there to guide students into a productive lifestyle and that each student, in the end, is responsible for his or her level of achievement. This is an indoctrinated way of life in South Korea and is reinforced through parent and peer pressure. Results are EXPECTED not anticipated. Until Americans do the right thing and embrace these core values we will, forever, be behind. We can no longer babysit at our schools. Results expected are results achieved.

8
2
notmetooJan. 26, 10 7:57 AM

This situation exists right now, for college students. Many are getting degrees without ever stepping inside a traditional classroom. But for high school kids? Not a good idea, on many levels.

3
4
coldbikerJan. 26, 10 8:20 AM

an end to new palatial school buildings???

3
4
notheocrat12Jan. 26, 10 8:58 AM

hit on the head. Blaming the schools is a convenient and easy target, and you mention the word "union" and the reactionaries get all in a hissy fit. The parents have a greater responsibility to over see their children and their education. Blaming the schools makes you look lazy, since you decided that once they are dropped off its their problem. Thanks again ME generation, baby boomers for dropping yet another problem on to the next generations lap. but hey, you had a lot fun while you did it, and that all counts.

4
2
inthloonybinJan. 26, 10 9:09 AM

We are already concerned with kids being isolated from peer contact due to texting and online (myspace, facebook) communication rather than face to face interaction. This type of learning will only make that worse. Kids (and adults) NEED to interact with one another. Otherwise they will not know how to handle real world interacion once they hit the real world- like the work force.

6
2
l6l6l6lJan. 26, 10 9:24 AM

Given that the US economy almost requires most families to have both adults working, who will watch the kids? It's not like this country is willing to invest in health care for children, or quality day care, or even in some states education for children. IF we went this way, how many children would just fall through the cracks. I love the whole "privatize" education argument. I guess we should just ignore the fact that this nation was built up on the backs of the fact that our founders knew that an educated societey would be a good thing, and that only the government could proliferate it. I guess we should ignore the successes of the rest of the world, in copying this model. Really, for some people, capitalism is some kind of idol to be worshipped. It makes sense when we are talking about optional activities. It's based on the concept of doing with, and without, when prices and products are/are not what we want. Do you really want that decision available to families - buy the crappy cheap education for your kids? I really don't get it.

1
1

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: What's your favorite Easter candy?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT