Minnesota targeting painkiller abusers

  • Article by: JOSEPHINE MARCOTTYmarcotty@startribune.com
  • Updated: January 6, 2010 - 8:26 PM

Facing an epidemic of abuse, Minnesota is now tracking prescriptions such as Vicodin and OxyContin to prevent doctor-shopping.

  • 57
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
BrewmanJan. 6, 10 9:10 PM

Bwahahahahah. Yeah, right. All doctors do now is write prescriptions. If you're lucky, a typical office visit will have you in contact with the doctor for about 2 minutes, and half of that time is spent writing the scrip. For this we get to pay $120+. And probably another $100 at the pharmacy. Doctors squeamish on presctiptions, that's a genuine knee slapper.

26
28
grude420Jan. 6, 10 9:53 PM

Any drug, no matter if it is legal or illegal is going to end up being abused sooner or later. And the solution to that is never to punish the abuser. Prohibition just flat out doesn't work. If someone's addicted to pain pills, or someone is addicted to heroin, is there really a difference? How about if they're addicted to alcohol? We shouldn't be locking up drug offenders. We should treat it as it is - an illness. Lock up the drug dealers like bayer and pfizer.

25
10
kenn36Jan. 6, 1010:00 PM

I am finding it difficult to get pain meds from my doctor, even I am the one with two rebuilt shattered legs and two herniated discs. I am lucky to get 30 tabs a month... lucky! And now I am going to be monitored?!

34
9
danlovajJan. 6, 1010:04 PM

Take the politics out, (rather don't put them in, in the first place). To the healthcare professional, whether a ER doctor, pharmacist, family practice, etc. we often are missing the big picture on the patients healthcare if the patient is not truthful about the care they are receiving from other physicians. I am a pharmacist, and if/when I may suspect a "doctor shopper" but often have difficulty proving it to the point that action is taken to have the patient seek the appropriate care for drug abuse. Ask any pharmacist or ER/Urgent Care doctor who often are only exposed to the patient for 15 minutes maximum. They don't know what information the patient is hiding when they want their Percocet filled and are willing to pay cash, sometimes over $500 for their prescription. I understand there are people with legitimate need for painkillers, but this program is intended to help identify drug abusers who either are abusing the drugs themselves, or turning around and selling them on the street for a nice profit. For 99% of the patients, this program has no effect. If you really have a need for heavy duty painkillers, then likely you have seen not only your primary care physician but two or three specialist. One of the biggest problems is actually under treating pain for many reasons. Having an established history with your prescribers is very important. It is those who see five doctors in two days, with a script for Vicodin from each doctor that poses a problem, not only for that individual but our society too.

28
7
njcarlsonJan. 6, 1010:14 PM

They arent punishing 'abusers' by monitoring those who doctor shop for drugs, they are trying to prevent the opportunity for enabling those who are seekers...for their own good! There is a difference between heroin and a prescription pain med-we can monitor the use/distribution of one and hopefully prevent on going abuse.

18
7
davidkc53Jan. 6, 1011:05 PM

A neighbor of mine who gets 30 Percocet a month for a bad back, has a 22 year old daughter who buys them on the street for her (as 30 isn't enough) and I don't blame her. Its only going to cause more problems for those who really need them! Keep the Damn Government out of it, they've messed up our Country bad enough with more disaster to come!

20
18
trustme71Jan. 6, 1011:30 PM

Michigan is over run with Meth!

14
6
roysandstromJan. 6, 1011:36 PM

Maine voters last November made their 10 year old medical marijuana law more liberal because it worked so well....while here our Gov P. vetos a bill to allow that option to those nearly dead. Pot helps many with pain and has never killed anyone, except the brave cops in the failed war on drugs, which many copos want changed (www.leap.cc)

26
4
ammunraJan. 6, 1011:47 PM

Does this mean people are just going to start using aliases and false addresses?

15
4
knowneck00Jan. 6, 1011:58 PM

I have a cousin who has been abusing the system for years. Goes all over the state seeing doctors, and doctoring his own perscriptions. When all else fails he just fakes a fall and calls an ambulance. It's amazing how these people can abuse the system.

9
17

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: What's your favorite Easter candy?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT