Evergreen question: To wrap or not to wrap?

  • Article by: ALYSSA FORD , Special to the Star Tribune
  • Updated: December 15, 2009 - 10:52 AM

More people are turning to burlap to protect evergreens from drying winter sun and winds. Should you do it? Well, it depends.

  • 8
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 8 of 8
killermebeDec. 15, 09 8:50 PM

From my experience with Arborvitae (the plants in the photo) the number one killer is salt spray. "Salt (sodium chloride) is used by many communities to prevent ice on the streets. Unfortunately, salt spray from roads causes brown foliage on deciduous or evergreen trees and shrubs. It can cause "witches'-broom" on deciduous plants. A witches'-broom is a cluster of twigs that forms on a branch. Prolonged exposure to salt spray can lead to dieback. Salt spray can drift to plants from nearby roads as the tires of passing cars kick up a salty spray. The water evaporates, leaving a salt residue. Damage is usually greatest on the side facing a roadway, or in areas where the drainage pattern causes accumulation of de-icing salts. Although the salt is applied throughout the winter, most salt damage occurs in late winter and early spring when plants are beginning active growth." I copied this from yardenerDOTcom

1
1
cherokee217wDec. 15, 0910:53 PM

Boy, that sure looks nice...maybe leave it up all year round...Burlap landscaping!

1
3
TomWilson4519CascoDec. 16, 09 6:20 AM

Photosynthesizing or salt is not nailing my arborvitaes. It's those darn rabbits nibbling away at the base of my trees. It took the entire growing season for my 6 trees to grow back. So this fall, I just wrapped from the base - up three feet. My wife says they look like snow cones.

1
1
tootiredDec. 16, 09 6:47 AM

but since my evergreen is only two feet tall, I decided to bury it with all that swow I shoveled after the first storm. Last winter it was left unprotected, and in the spring it turned brown and most of the needles fell off. It took all summer and fall for it to recover and green back up. I will just have to make sure it stays protected this winter.

2
0
parksoy125Dec. 16, 0911:43 AM

Winter burn has always happened but not to the degree that I've seen the past few years. Is it just lower rainfall than normal? I water them more when we get less rainfall which we have over the past few years. I mean its not like we got 2 inches of rainfall in these past few years. Nobody notices.........sun burning in a different spectrum? This is probably way, way above the normal thinking. I'm involved in the earth sciences and have been watching other things in regards to the sun.......there are a lot of reports (very difficult to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt) that say/show various protective layers that normally shield the earth for all sorts of different things, suns rays, space radiation that is normal in occurrence in space is/are breaking apart or thinning. Why has skin cancer in humans increased by about 1000% in the past 50 years. That isn't a typo......1000%. There are other items also that relate to sun and space radiation reaching the ground in greater numbers or to a greater degree. In regards to Global warming or climate change.....many countries military are and have been creating a shield or blowing/dropping particles into the upper atmosphere by airplane for the past 10 years or more. Wonder if the artificial screen is for the protection from dangerous sun rays and not to cool the planet. They could be selling global warming and climate change because it sounds softer, sounds less scary than the sun is burning or some of earths protective layers are waning......which is resulting in changing plant growth in many cases killing the trees. These plants and bushes only burn out or die from the side of the bush that is facing the sun.

0
2
RanickDec. 16, 0911:54 AM

I've got to wrap my evergreen shrubs or snow will accumulate on them and bend them right over to the ground...not a good look.

0
0
gregorycarlDec. 16, 09 2:37 PM

I've had evergreens overheat and perish if wrapped too tightly as in the reference photo. Top needs to be open to allow heat to escape. You simply want the sun and wind to stay off the plant. If you do wrap tightly as in photo, you will need to remove burlap a few weeks early (Mid March). If you have it wrapped loosely the rule is April Fools day. We had a ton of rain in late fall which should be good for us this spring...

0
0
worldcitizenDec. 20, 0911:19 AM

There used to be a product called Wilt Proof - add water and use a garden sprayer. Forms a film on the foliage that protects from winter drying or salt spray from a road. The film degrades and disappears in the warm Spring sun.

0
0
  • 1 - 8 of 8

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT