Inside King's dome

  • Article by: james lileks , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 23, 2011 - 3:39 PM

A mesmerizing master of the macabre, Stephen King finds inspiration for his 51st novel, "Under the Dome," in human frailty.

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mnjusticeNov. 18, 09 9:49 AM

King is a joke. Most of his books are about some family trouble in frigging Maine. I am surprised there are not better writers out there!

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bbusch911Nov. 18, 0910:26 AM

I am almost finished with the book. It does have a lot of similarities to The Stand (one of my favorites). When it comes to the Simpson movie, King did not use the plot from the Simpson movie. He actually started writing it back in 1976, and it was about a town being trapped under a dome. King is a master of character development and story telling. He may not be for everyone, but he is one of the greastest writers of our time.

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ebrandelNov. 18, 0910:28 AM

The Simpsons were not the first to use the idea of a domed city in a book or movie, although it's not surprising that's the example you came up with. King bases many of his novels in Maine because he's from there. Crazy, no? If he were from MN and based his books here, we'd all love it. And there are better writers out there, but King is one who consistently produces good page turners. If you're in the mood for a wonderful journey, pick up the Dark Tower series.

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mamazogNov. 18, 0911:42 AM

Check out King's columns in Entertainment Weekly or his short pieces in the New Yorker magazine. He seems like a very "normal" well-rounded guy. As for the Maine-centric solipsism, that's pretty hilarious coming from a Minnesotan! We (myself definitely included) lurv to read about our area. And better to write about what you know intimately than try to make stuff up and screw it up royally. Go, Uncle Stevie! I remain a loyal Constant Reader.

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Tuy1929Nov. 18, 09 1:58 PM

He's successful at what he is good at, so he keeps doing the same thing for the money. ... But 51 horror novels? With all his money and writing talent, you might think he might want to challenge himself and write something different? Something that might get people to think or act in an altruistic way. After all, God says don't bury your talents. To me, he is burying his.

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bbusch911Nov. 18, 09 2:33 PM

I think sometimes people look at Carrie, Cujo, and It when thinking of his works. There are others like The Green Mile, Shawshank Redemption, Stand By Me, and The Dark Tower Series. I think the Dark Tower is one the best series of fiction written. If you like Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter you need to read the Dark Tower series.

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mamazogNov. 18, 09 2:34 PM

You're evidently not familiar with Mr. King's work. Had you read "Needful Things" or "Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption" you would see that there is significant food for thought between the pages of these so-called horror novels. Of course, it's easier to skim an article, form a negative opinion, and post a judgmental comment.

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lguptillNov. 18, 09 4:35 PM

I will always think one of his best stories was the Long Walk. Nothing quite catches humanity the way that story does.

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mnjusticeNov. 18, 09 6:22 PM

He was in his prime in the '80s when he cranked out the books. I liked this short stories like in "Different Seasons," which I am sure you could love to read on airplane rides.

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marciacarlsoNov. 20, 09 9:54 AM

I finished the book last night. Frankly, after what was a long, enjoyable read, I expected a more thought provoking conclusion. Very lame ending, almost written as an afterthought or toss-away, or gee whiz, I've got to finish this thing. How do I end it and get it to publisher? My feelings. Wonder if any other readers felt likewise?

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