Glenn Karwoski: The idea man

  • Article by: TODD NELSON , Special to the Star Tribune
  • Updated: November 9, 2009 - 12:07 AM

Glenn Karwoski is taking his classroom-tested approach to teaching creativity and innovation to the corporate world.

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awshucksNov. 9, 09 6:02 AM

Often it's not so much that employees don't have great ideas, the problem is getting management to listen objectively. If Karwoski's program encourages that, both employee and employer will reap the benefits.

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stevenbetoNov. 9, 09 6:32 AM

Ideas are rejected by middle management if they come from a perceived subordinate realm. If the same idea comes from a perceived superior realm, the idea is quickly assimilated. Many managers are not able to evaluate an idea based on its individual merits alone. I asked the Director about this and she said, "They can't do that." Managers are not allowed to think for themselves. This occured at a Fortune 500 company in the metro region. Corporate policy is the greatest limiting factor to creative thinking.

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daylateNov. 9, 09 6:45 AM

I totally agree with the other two commenters. In general, and in my experience, management stands in the way if ideas come from the proletariat. Furthermore, they cling to the "we've always done it this way" mentality. If they'd just relax, shed their fear, and shelve the ego, we'd all be better off.

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rmjeffersonNov. 9, 09 7:39 AM

Find a way to give management credit for your idea and they'll implement it.

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maxiongNov. 9, 09 9:02 AM

and I would recommend this class to anyone whoever wanted to do what they are doing better. This is a great class and it really teaches you the real meaning of creativity. I wish this had been one of the first classes I took instead of the last because it makes you realize there's probably a better way of doing the things you've been doing that you haven't thought about. Congrats Karwoski!

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tostenNov. 9, 09 9:16 AM

America's industrial strength has come in large part from the ability of frustrated geniuses to start new businesses. Large corporations, with their cumbersome culture and social structure don't work for everyone, especially innovators. If we lose the ability to establish small business, we lose more than just the immediate national product. We lose a lot of our ability to innovate.

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epbergNov. 9, 0910:17 AM

From my 35 years in industrial R&D with over 20 patents: entrepreneurs have to be creative since they have bet their future on their idea and must create or die; industrial scientists/engineers must have support from upper management to try out new, and business relevant ideas without career risk. Eventually, in both cases it depends on what funding is available for next generation creative projects. In my experience, a cash-cow is needed which can be depended on to supply the necessary money to innovate--either a VC or a Scotch Tape.

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apulkrabekNov. 9, 09 7:08 PM

It seems this is either very poorly written or is a cover for the Strib getting a sweetheart deal from this guy to give them tips on innovation for their own problems (e.g.quid pro quo). Come on, posting the guys rates and some very loose customer praise? Let's hope the Strib gets good innovation tips from him. Maybe that way they can continue to exist, hire back the 100 they are letting go and not have to shill for somebody purported to be a guru.

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jeaninmplsNov. 9, 09 8:50 PM

Glenn is a very intelligent man and deserves every bit of credit he gets.

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