In Massachusetts: A model many are watching

  • Article by: CHEN MAY YEE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: September 20, 2009 - 12:08 AM

Massachusetts, which in 2006 mandated coverage for all, is an experiment in reform.

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n3wc4stleSep. 19, 0910:41 PM

Please explain why there is an apostrophe in "sees" in the caption of this picture. What happened to correct punctuation? Or newspaper editing?

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hsr0601Sep. 20, 09 2:20 AM

1. As regards a make-believe scheme, the source of funding coming from a middle class is utterly against the commitment of Democratic party. 2. No cost-competitive advantage does not clear the grave concern about the unsustainable cost of overall health care program in the long run. 3. Even with some benefit for primary practitioners, the baseless scheme does not come with fundamental payment reform, or a pay for value reimbursement formula. It means that the insurer-friendly scheme is not cleaning up the concerns over a quality issue and $9trillion of deficit over the next decade. ((Here is some of CBO analysis : While the costs of the financial bailouts and economic stimulus bills are staggering, they are only a fraction of the coming costs from Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. Over the next decade, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projects that each year Medicaid will expand by 7 percent, Medicare by 6 percent, and Social Security by 5 percent. These programs face a 75-year shortfall of $43 trillion--60 times greater than the gross cost of the $700 billion TARP financial bailout)). 4. For Medicare & Medicaid system to survive from the most wasteful structure on earth, enough savings by ways of fundamental changes need to be secured, in return, the savings thereof suffice to meet the goal of well-planned public option. ((Even with far less visits to docs, which average a half or a third of them in any other free states, Americans pay roughly twice as much per person right now)). 5. For the record, prior to nation-wide deployment of reform, The State Of "Yes We Can", Minnesota influenced by Mayo clinic spends "20 percent" less per patient than the national average and 31 percent less than in the highest cost state. It highlights that no substantial tax raise is needed at least for sure. ((The $583 billion of revenue package, and the astronomical savings of public option aside, "20%" of $923.5bn (the combined Medicare and Medicaid cost per year, as of July) represents around $184.7bn per year and 1.847trillion over the next decade, and this patient-centered value alone could be sufficient to meet the goal of public option)). 6. In brief, the long-awaited and most hopeful health care plan is to meet these criterias : Affordability, Quality, and A Check function against runaway premiums thereof. Clearly enough, due largely to its lower overhead cost, purchasing power and fundamental payment reform, the well-planned public option would be an even better candidate than the fabricated scheme by THE INDUSTRY in these aforementioned regards. Now is the moment to turn page to contemporary energy and financial upgrades glossed over in 8 years.

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Maybrick5Sep. 20, 09 6:03 AM

when he got brain cancer he didn't go to Boston General or any hospital in Mass. He went to Duke University to get treatment. If Massachusetts care is so great, why didn't Uncle Teddy use it? Perhaps because better care was available elsewhere? When Joe Sixpack truckdriver from Boston gets cancer, will MassCare pay for him to go to Duke?

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hauglandSep. 20, 09 6:15 AM

I simply love it when a democrat says we need to pay doctors for outcome but when it comes to teachers that is completely out of the question.....

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jeffpoSep. 20, 09 6:26 AM

How about TORT reform so more doctors can actually be doctors without having to worry about getting sued? You can't have one without the other. Oh BTW, doctors are leaving the field because of this. They can't afford thier insurance premiums.

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chazpattonSep. 20, 09 7:46 AM

You said it well: we need a true public option. It's the only thing that will lower costs. Any 'reform' plan that makes insurance mandatory without providing a strong public option would be counter-productive. It would be nothing but a bonanza for the insurance conglomerates.

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mnhusker4Sep. 20, 09 7:50 AM

Health care in Mass. is failing big time, does the story tell us that?

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olsonb5Sep. 20, 09 8:41 AM

they are over budget by billions and have two choices 1) raise taxes a lot or 2) ration care. i lived in boston a few years ago and it is a terrible system!

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ljb6599Sep. 20, 09 8:44 AM

The president supports Tort reform.He said this in his speech to congress.

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ljb6599Sep. 20, 09 8:47 AM

What is your proof that Mass.health care is failing big time?

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