Board's e-mailing violated open meeting law, commissioner determines

  • Article by: KEVIN DUCHSCHERE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 23, 2011 - 1:59 PM

The Gang Strike Force case clarifies how the Open Meeting Law might be interpreted in the world of 21st-century communications.

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mattaudioSep. 9, 09 9:42 PM

...then put it all online where we can all read it. Problem solved.

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tikidog1Sep. 10, 09 6:46 AM

e-mail or some form of it seems to be the new future and government will have to adjust. The public must be informed however, so how do we approach this?

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mnjorcSep. 10, 09 7:08 AM

Do we as taxpayers really want to pay people to meet face to face for every single little discussion? Maybe make the e-mail records part of public record or have the discussions take place in an online forum or something. We really need to be working harder to find ways to cut government costs not add to it.

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mnguardian01Sep. 10, 09 7:10 AM

this is the way of the future. There are distinct hurdles to cross as to public information laws but most of those hurdles are locked up in antiquated technology and mentalities of the state departments. Besides, I do not see how a meeting can be held by e-mail, yahoo IM sure, web cam definitely. But a meeting by email is like playing chess through the mail - if you have nothing better to do I guess it works which may explain why the state departments work the way they do. Personally, I can't wait for the day that every county seat will have a room or rooms where citizens can go to legislative committees via web cam and interact with the capital without having to drive there.

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mnjorcSep. 10, 09 7:10 AM

Do we as taxpayers really want to pay people to meet face to face for every single little discussion? Maybe make the e-mail records part of public record or have the discussions take place in an online forum or something. We really need to be working harder to find ways to cut government costs not add to it.

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gregherlingSep. 10, 09 7:54 AM

the commish did wrong , but not as wrong as the high school kids who harrassed the Dayton family --let those kids pay for their misdeeds by making them come up with the $ to repair the Daytons house , and further , make them do community service by attending commish meetings and reporting on them by email

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EleanoreSep. 10, 09 9:55 AM

E-anything is not public because it deny's access. The future is getting uglier by the minute.

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pkochSep. 10, 0912:10 PM

Be careful what you wish for? You might wake up one day and find a brand new Viking Stadium approved through email meetings.

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David_GrossSep. 10, 0912:50 PM

*If* the email had been, "I think that we need to meet in order to respond to this question from the media," everything would have been OK. That assumes that, then, a public meeting would have been held, authorizing a press-release in the name of the Board, discussing and analyzing the facts. The level of the detail of the public discussion may have been somewhat different, and any "spin doctoring" would have been transparent. That's the purpose of the Open Meeting Law. Good "pick-up" John Borger!

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