The buzz: Urban beekeepers are a growing colony

  • Article by: KIM PALMER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: June 23, 2009 - 7:32 PM

Home is where the hive is for urban beekeepers, who hope to improve their gardens, produce honey or protect this misunderstood - and possibly endangered - insect.

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beefitterJun. 23, 09 5:22 PM

Imagine starting a hive and learning about these special insects. I think these beekeepers should be commended for helping honeybees survive in today's world. Protecting our food supply is a noble cause that beekeepers never get credit for.

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gvrtwpkwyJun. 23, 0910:30 PM

My salvia are covered by honeybees. Not the usual bumble bees.

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kjlundJun. 24, 09 8:10 AM

It is a wonderful hobby but demanding. The bees have to be attended to each week so the queen doesn't take half of the hive and leave

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pufpufJun. 24, 09 8:12 AM

Ok, this is all nice. But, does anyone understand what these imports are doing to our native Bee's? (answer = No) Just some food for thought.

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lawrerosJun. 24, 09 9:08 AM

The whole point of this article was that the people in MN are getting bees that are native to this area. Your comment is uninformed...

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helterJun. 24, 0912:59 PM

Lawreros, you are wrong. Most beekeepers keep European honeybees because they produce more than their smaller native counterparts. Pufpuf has a point.

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ajriemerJun. 24, 09 2:14 PM

I don't know if it intentional or not, but I have a friend who got stung numerous times by a colony he set up on his farm. It was a new colony last year, but he had been keeping bees a long time. This colony, which should have been pretty subdued, was very territorial, and would attack if you got too close. They were so persistent that they squeezed their way through his safety gear, earning him welts on the neck, arms and face. He had at least 17 stings before he dove into a pond. He had the colony destroyed later that summer. The honey wasn't worth that much trouble.

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bradbkrJun. 24, 09 6:30 PM

Sting season has begun! Learn how to cure stings instantly at http://www.BeeStingCure.com/order Bee Sting Cure Field Testing on http://www.YouTube.com/BeeStingCure George Ciccarone of Cincinnati's WKRC-TV interviews Ray Baker and others about the effectiveness of Baker's Venom Cleanser on stings in people as the stings occurs. This is a must see amazing video about how to cure bee stings with Baker's Venom Cleanser.

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beefitterJun. 24, 09 7:42 PM

Aj has it wrong about African traits. Bees in many ways are like people. Attitude wise that is. Some are ornery, some are nice, some work hard, some are lazy. The point is, the queen is where the attitude lies. Replace the queen and the hive will change its disposition to the genetics of the new queen. It is that simple. Had his friend replaced that aggressive queen he would have fixed the problem. His friend knew they were not happy to see him and he should have fixed it early on and not let them become what they became.

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thomas281Jun. 24, 0910:46 PM

I am glad Minneapolis is finally doing the right thing by realizing honey bees are beneficial. Now if they would only drop the "plus 80% of the property owners within 100 feet of the property the hive is on" or at least change it to within 100 feet from the hive

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