Scientists hopeful mussels will come back

  • Article by: TOM MEERSMAN , Star Tribune
  • Updated: June 11, 2009 - 9:33 AM

Scientists are finding signs of hope in efforts to reestablish native mussels in the Mississippi River downstream from the Ford Dam.

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fishheadJun. 11, 09 6:30 AM

That's great news.

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noggnbloggnJun. 11, 09 6:46 AM

This is why people put too much faith in the scientific process. Eventually, we can problem-solve, until we have some idea what may be going on in an ecosystem. But we are never really sure, because of all the variables. So, why is everyone so sure that Al Gore, who isn't a scientist (and not even a very good politician), has it right on his Global Warming theory? Oh, I'm sorry, I meant "Climate Change" theory. Does he study the Sun to understand the source of our energy? No, he looks at only the man-made / human activities part -- very little understanding of earth processes, weather, natural climate fluctuations, etc. And, he says there is "consensus" for his ideas, when that is actually not possible. If it were true there would be no need for his (propaganda) film, nor his Nobel prize. My point is really just this: science is always flawed, because it involves people, and people are prone to mistakes, until they eventually figure stuff out. Given enough time, the climate "problem" will be better understood, but it will take more time. Mr. Gore is premature -- but ready to profit, if he can convince enough people to listen. The job of any politician is to persuade, which is why Al is self-appointed to this crusade -- he stands to make a lot of dough (even as he refuses to debate the topic). Sorry for the off-topic commentary, but people will be reasonable about science, until you mention climate and then science is not to be questioned, which is ridiculous.

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woodyagJun. 11, 09 9:02 AM

can take any subject, and turn it into oil industry propaganda against science. These morons are PAID, folks; to hang around on blogs and make these comments- signing different names, and using different styles. Paid. Look it up- Wikipedia, "denial industry" is a good place to find the basics. Even Newsweek has published proof.

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a1batrossJun. 11, 0910:01 AM

You'd have us changing the wiper blades on the bus even as it plunges into the crevasse. Your partisan rancor does not alter the underlying reality that we've been poisoning our environment since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.

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native99Jun. 11, 0910:46 AM

I wonder if the Effective Microorganism product I read about would help. It's a liquid formed from bacteria. When applied to polluted water it becomes drinkable. Some people who live on the islands near Hiroshima where given batches of EM to pour down their drains. The results were immediate and unmistakable. The clumps of sludge along the shore disappeared and schools of fish began to return, and octopuses and clams too. Another village used it and their once-barren bay became clean, clams and frogs reappeared. Maybe with the stimulus money the state could buy a bunch of this stuff and clean our lakes and rivers. It's also good for soil - it produces high quality veggies without the use of chemicals or synthetic fertilizers. Examples taken from The Secret Life of Water by Masaru Emoto (p. 61)

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native99Jun. 11, 0910:46 AM

I wonder if the Effective Microorganism product I read about would help. It's a liquid formed from bacteria. When applied to polluted water it becomes drinkable. Some people who live on the islands near Hiroshima where given batches of EM to pour down their drains. The results were immediate and unmistakable. The clumps of sludge along the shore disappeared and schools of fish began to return, and octopuses and clams too. Another village used it and their once-barren bay became clean, clams and frogs reappeared. Maybe with the stimulus money the state could buy a bunch of this stuff and clean our lakes and rivers. It's also good for soil - it produces high quality veggies without the use of chemicals or synthetic fertilizers. Examples taken from The Secret Life of Water by Masaru Emoto (p. 61)

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carlbsJun. 11, 0911:29 AM

I figured these guys were out there, given the giant pockets the industries have to pay just about anybody for anything. But, I didn't know they had invaded the blogosphere to this extent. Now I see it clearly. Pretty discusting. Thanks for the info and keep reminding people of the smoke and mirrors.

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youmustobeyJun. 11, 09 1:21 PM

Absolutely, left right and in between.

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noggnbloggnJun. 11, 09 3:01 PM

IMO: You are all nuts. But that is just an opinion...

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mnguardian01Jun. 11, 0910:16 PM

Water quality must be getting better but the real question is why? Most likely the zebra mussels. As to the bacteria treatment, you bet your sweet arse it works. The problem is the DNR and PCA think that the laws of nature do not apply within the Minnesota borders because we're special. Go ahead and ask them, the only technology that works is over 40 years old. That mentality does explain a lot doesn't it? Oh, BTW - NEVER try to explain how a ecosystem works to a public employee unless you want a REALLY bad headache.

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