Could an old elm be the next big thing?

  • Article by: KIM PALMER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: May 5, 2009 - 3:04 PM

In the search for new disease-resistant elm species, some of the hottest prospects are homegrown.

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horochadMay. 5, 09 3:32 PM

Maybe they can finally develop a disease resistant chestnut tree. Goodness knows they've been working on THAT one for something close to 40 years.

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manitoulinMay. 5, 09 6:16 PM

"It's pretty effective. It kills the susceptible ones pretty quickly," said U plant pathologist Benjamin Held. But some seedlings survive.

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bosshogMay. 5, 09 7:28 PM

People and governments need to make sure to plant/manage for a diverse range of tree species native to Minnesota instead of monocultures to avoid repeats of having all the trees in an entire city/suburban die off. Unfortunately many counties continue to manage their forests for single tree species (Poplar) because that is what the local mills want. Everyone is going to be in a world of hurt WHEN a disease/insect gets here that kills/damages poplars.

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bluebird74May. 5, 09 8:41 PM

I realize that anybody that would read this article would have a working knowledge of trees and elms in particular, but I would have liked a little more detail about how many elms there were locally and how big of a tree elms get to be at full size. Perhaps a comparison to the emerald ash borer? Where's the perspective?

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noggnbloggnMay. 5, 09 8:55 PM

Just what are you willing to do to obtain a pre-determined outcome? Making those saplings suffer, so. It's just not fair. Monoculture: I think you should apply some of your notions to the human race, not just trees. Less meddling in what "ought" to be by the lefty Utopians please, more minding your own business. Thank you.

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noggnbloggnMay. 5, 09 9:56 PM

Just throwing something out there, to see what "sticks"...

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halfabubbleMay. 6, 0912:34 AM

...back in the 70's when they cut down every tree that looked like it was going to die due to DED, they cut it down. Wonder how many of them would have shown resistance to DED if they were allowed to live on.

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bildo69May. 6, 0910:35 AM

What I want to know is, what happens to the unused cloned tree embryoes?

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eterrellMay. 6, 09 2:53 PM

I knew many an infected tree that, for one reason or another, didn't get tagged for years. Yeah, they were kind of sad looking around the edges, but they were beneficial live trees for many years after they got sick. I tried to ask early on whether if all the trees were infected in a certain area, then why not just take the ones on the perimeter of the infestation and let the rest live on as long as they were viable. Sort of like a firebreak in a forest fire. Obviously clear cutting did not eliminate the disease, so it really seemed a sad, premature destruction of good tree cover.

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mitcheMay. 6, 0910:22 PM

I'm sorry Kim Palmer did not mention the New Horizon elms that are DED resistant. The Mpls Park Board planted 22 New Horizon trees along the New Brighton Blvd frontage road (at the Mpls - St. Anthony boarder) in 1996 - as a test. They look terrific now. I put one in my yard on Taft St. NE and after 12 years it is doing fine.

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