Letter of the Day: Waterboarding was too good for the 9/11 mastermind

  • Article by: Chris Trumble
  • Updated: April 21, 2009 - 5:50 PM

Excuse me if I do not shed a tear for Khalid Shaikh Mohammed. The truth is he was waterboarded once for every 16 people he helped murder on Sept. 11, 2001.

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davehougApr. 21, 09 6:01 PM

Talk to those who interrogated WWII suspects and those who spend their lives getting information from others. They will tell you a man willing to die for his side will gladly tell as many lies as his captors will swallow. Do we really think the Spanish Inquistion had it right?

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dityspeedApr. 21, 09 6:02 PM

Needs some hits on their website to feature this as their lead letter.

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solocoApr. 21, 09 6:06 PM

If someone took my little girl, had her hidden, and admitted it, how long would the police question that person before calling it a day? Give me 5 minutes with that person and I will incentivize that person with any means necessary. I do not equivocate not torturing with being civilized.

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xjritterApr. 21, 09 6:15 PM

" I do not equivocate not torturing with being civilized." Stop! You're torturing the language already. I am not equivocating.

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samo45Apr. 21, 09 6:29 PM

How was it proved that Khalid Shaihk Mohammed was the mastermind? Presumably Bush and Cheney were more certain of his guilt than they were of those WOMDs in Iraq.

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ulysses23Apr. 21, 09 6:40 PM

Freedom does not equal safety. Part of the price we pay for living in a just, open, and free society, is the inherent risks we take by being the exemplars of such. As the good guys, we may expose ourselves to more danger by not imposing the same draconian population-control techniques used by the Islamofascists, or by the Stalinist USSR, or by any other number of dictatorships throughout history. We may be putting ourselves and loved ones at risk by not submitting to the by-any-means-needed philosophy which leads to secret prisons, illegal wiretapping, and torture. However, as an American, I'll gladly accept that risk, rather than sacrifice my hard-won freedoms and rights in the name of some so-called security. I'll take that risk, rather than let my own moral standards sink to the level of those whom we fight. As a veteran, I once stood with hand over heart at the MEPS and swore to defend the US Constitution. As United States citizens, we should all be happy to take that responsibility and the danger which comes along with it. Don't be afraid to do things the right way and the hard way - our forefathers certainly weren't.

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BigPeteApr. 21, 09 6:53 PM

This country does not have the collective intelligence to win the war on terrorism

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paulmschmitzApr. 21, 09 7:01 PM

I like "incentivize". With words like that, that has to actually be "W" writing!

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ZobenicaApr. 21, 09 7:07 PM

It is time to abandon the fiction that a moral, democratic nation has not engaged in cruel measures during times of war...or, by doing such, has lost its humanity in the process. Summary executions, hangings are part of our history. Reading accounts in the media about what constitutes "torture" suggests that the term has been defined down. As a former Marine aviator, along with hundreds of others, I now discover that my own government is guilty of torturing its aircrews. Author Christopher Hitchens, newsman Steve Harrigan, an assistant Attorney General, and curious high-schoolers have allowed themselves to be water-boarded. Would they have consented to the common folly of hitting a finger with a hammer?

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ZobenicaApr. 21, 09 7:07 PM

It is time to abandon the fiction that a moral, democratic nation has not engaged in cruel measures during times of war...or, by doing such, has lost its humanity in the process. Summary executions, hangings are part of our history. Reading accounts in the media about what constitutes "torture" suggests that the term has been defined down. As a former Marine aviator, along with hundreds of others, I now discover that my own government is guilty of torturing its aircrews. Author Christopher Hitchens, newsman Steve Harrigan, an assistant Attorney General, and curious high-schoolers have allowed themselves to be water-boarded. Would they have consented to the common folly of hitting a finger with a hammer?

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