A lower tolerance for cuts in higher ed

  • Article by: LORI STURDEVANT , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 28, 2009 - 10:42 AM

Job growth is expected in knowledge-based industries -- emphasis on 'knowledge.'

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bernice3Mar. 28, 09 3:31 PM

the creator of the "Taxpayer Protection Pledge" that Pawlenty refuses to break no matter how many people get hurt. Article VIII of the State Constitution should be amended to include "deliberate harm to the state and/or its people" as justification for impeachment of a governor. Norquist's goal is to shrink government by starving it, and Pawlenty has done his part to help. We have lost $1 billion per year in revenue for the past 8 years because of his refusal to tax the wealthy at the rates they paid before the 1999/2000 cuts. Sounds to me like deliberate harm!

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ORIOLE75Mar. 29, 09 5:37 AM

Mr Bruninks chose to make a Football stadium a priority. So now there is no money for education. Duh.

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linuxguyMar. 29, 09 9:59 AM

Every college graduate is like winning a million dollar lottery, yet because times are tough today we are cutting back on the number of college graduates. How short sighted. We need more college graduates to stay competitive.

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occam73Mar. 29, 09 8:17 PM

How do some people think we have more Fortune 500 companies per capita in MN than any other state? Two words: higher education. This is one time where we really get what we pay for--don't balance the state budget on the back of higher ed.

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wbgleasonMar. 29, 09 9:40 PM

I am afraid that there really isn't anything in this opinion piece that wasn't in the one sixteen months ago. As late as December 5, 2008, according to MPR: The University of Minnesota was planning to ask lawmakers for more than $200 million in new money to fund an increase in salaries, prop up scholarships, build a new natural history museum and fix infrastructure problems on campus." Do President Bruninks somehow think that funding for the U of M is more important than that of K-12 education, than MNSCU, than proper health care funding? Time to suck it up, President Bruininks. Let's demonstrate some sacrifice on your part as an encouragement to the rest of the University Community. So far, Joe Dowling, Olga Viso, Kaywin Feldman, Osmo Vanska, and many other presdidents of colleges and universities have taken ten percent - or more - salary cuts. When are you going to demonstrate some leadership?

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bus411Mar. 30, 09 9:04 AM

If we are going to continue to compete in Minnesota, education K through college, needs to be funded. Some states (some much poorer than we are) offer free state tuition to residents as I noticed on a news report over the weekend. And they will continue to fund it because they want to up their intellectual job growth. A key might be to freeze salaries and use the saved funding to serve the increased demand this economy created. We might lose a few really talented professers and researchers that others might have outbid us for anyway, but the rest of the staff should be able to hold the line just like the rest of us. I do agree we do need a governor who thinks more of his state than his own ambitions. Neither Pawlenty nor any DFL or GOP potential candidates I've seen yet appear to be that selfless.

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pdxtranApr. 2, 09 1:14 PM

of eliminating as many administrative jobs as possible. Administrative bloat, the proliferation of employees who do nothing but generate paperwork and hold meetings, taking away from professors' teaching, preparation, and research time, is a phenomenon that most outsiders aren't aware of. If I were Higher Education Czarina, I'd go through the various campuses looking at each administrative position, evaluating its necessity (some people actually do perform important functions, like coordinating the maintenance staff or keeping track of alumni), skill level (does this job actually warrant a high salary, or is it something anyone could learn in a couple of weeks?), and scope of duties (does this position really need an assistant?) Every college I know of is hiring more administrators and fewer professors. Instead of hiring full-time professors, they hire part-time instructors, who come to campus only to teach their classes and then leave for their other part-time job at another college. That seems backwards to me.

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