Legislator sets sights on academy to teach math and science to gifted

  • Article by: NORMAN DRAPER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 7, 2009 - 6:52 PM

The proposal by Rep. Melissa Hortman is up against the budget deficit, but she wants to get the discussion rolling.

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inrealityMar. 8, 09 4:09 PM

reform our government run educational system (and funding mechanisms) so that parents have real choice and their is real competition. If we did this then the market would naturally develop these acadamies if there was a demand for them. We are looking at extending our exissting failing system instead of getting to the core of the problem. If we fix the entire system then the government doesn't have to worry about such things again, of course the people that always say they are "for the children" will oppose any changes because they want to protect themselves, their unions and their cushy government jobs. Our so-called leaders don't want to fix the problem because they want votes and money. Until we are willing to deal with the core issues this entire system will continue to fail us and drain our families of their precious income through massive taxation. Reform is needed and not more talk of yet more government expansion of education.

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leographicoMar. 10, 09 2:25 PM

Interestingly enough, many countries have such schools. As matter of fact, former Soviet Union had a number of K-12 specialized schools, and I personally know some graduates, who are now world class engineers and mathematicians. This is one of the reason why USSR launched first trip to the Universe, and developed many high-tech theories, such as HDTV, and so. Thus, this initiative (to have science specialized schools for gifted children) can have greater impact on future science giving ways to educate those kids who are capable and evolving, but don't have this opportunity (and resources for private schooling). Right now education in US promotes diversity of high and slow learners by trying to pack children of different learning attitudes into one school. Additionally, general K-12 system in US is focused on slow-learning students, thus all programs are adjusted to easy and minimal challenge, providing possibilities for "handicap" grading, and allowing by state/county tests adjustment to match local IQ levels. All together this causes unavoidable failing of US K-12 educational system compare to other developed countries.

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khunnitMar. 12, 0910:01 PM

Treating all students in the room as if they are moving at the same speed is a waste of resources and harms all the student's progress. Teachers can't help the students who need it, can't challenge the students who are bored and the students in the middle get get short changed too.

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sparkychick9Mar. 16, 0912:01 AM

I am a senior high school student soon to be graduating from the Math and Science Academy Middle and High School in Woodbury MN....this article describes what my school is and does, focuses on the Maths and sciences for childern who want to go into a math or science degree program. In general, the small population (about 300 students 6-12 grade) and math and science ordinated people who are bighter then most. The average in my graduatin class is about a 3.0, if not higher. Guess what my point is...how is this a new idea?

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