New toy-safety laws are no game for toymakers

  • Article by: MITCH ANDERSON , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 10, 2009 - 11:53 PM

A new law aims to enhance toy safety, but some say the associated costs may be unaffordable for small companies.

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HoneyDogJan. 11, 09 4:37 AM

Bad research there strib, products made BEFORE the effective date of this bill will be included. People reselling older products on Ebay and at garage sales will have to comply. For questions and answers on this bill, go to http://www.govtrack.us/users/questions.xpd?topic=bill:h110-4040

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HoneyDogJan. 11, 09 4:59 AM

And this will kill off business from people who make one of a kind items by hand like this maker of American Indian Regalia: http://nationalbankruptcyday.com/archive/cpsia-cultural-genocide-another-win-for-congress/

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vetkidd1Jan. 11, 09 6:47 AM

why don't we just take all the toys away from children, why should they have fun ,let them just grow up to be grumps like the rest the world

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HoneyDogJan. 11, 09 6:51 AM

Its more than just toys. Its clothes, furniture used by kids, CDs, DVDs, etc.

And if as question, if Amy Klobuchar was championing this bill, why didn't she vote on it?

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questionmarkJan. 11, 09 7:00 AM

to be tweaked. There does need to be an exemption for small businesses like Beka and livingroom operations, especially in this economy.

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HoneyDogJan. 11, 09 7:19 AM

Small businesses that make one of a kind items, or "livingroom" operations have been trying to get an exemption passed for them, the responses they are getting from their legislators hasn't been positive as far as getting those exemptions.

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elind56Jan. 11, 09 7:38 AM

resulting in poorly thought out laws with the usual result. Unintended consequences that do more damage than what the law is intended to prevent. All based on ONE extremely isolated incident. This will cost the private sector (read: consumer) billions to implement and will drive the truly creative, small manufacturers out of business. In their zeal to protect "The Children" they have cast a wide net that will needlessly entangle guys like Dan Marshall in an expensive, and potentially prohibitive, nightmare of regulatory BS. This latest round of "Lead Hysteria" is spreading like an infection and is threatening other industries. Shrill cries for banning all things with even a trace of lead seems to be the politically correct fad of the day, even when there is no scientific evidence of any harm done. Lead is a cheap and very useful metal that in 99.999% of it's applications, is harmless to all, even "The Children". Regardless, the move is on to ban it from existence which will result in higher costs for everyone BUT.... at least we'll be .0001% safer. The lawmakers jobs aren't at stake so why should they care. They get their "feel-good" moment, a couple headlines and perhaps a few cheap votes. Oh...and if you are against this legislation? Then you hate children.

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idontthinksoJan. 11, 0912:37 PM

Actually, HoneyDog, the CPSC released on Thursday guidelines that make it so that resellers do NOT have to test all of their products. They have to be careful that they don't sell recalled products, but they don't have to test everything. http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09086.html

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rlwr51Jan. 11, 09 1:18 PM

Just because a prototype doesn't contain lead doesn't mean that at least some of the product won't contain lead. China has an over abundance of lead from "recycleing" our waste and need an outlet for it. Our laws can't dictate what a factory in China will do. A child will not likely swollow a bicycle valve stem, but they might swollow a necklace or a small knob off something that is not even sold as a toy, which is not covered by this law. I would bet the ones pushing to have this bill strictly enforced on small living room businesses are big businesses who don't want even this competition. What if these people simply label these items as "not intended to be a toy".I feel we would be safer and more effective if we monitored the manufacture of these items, which would meam buying US products or impose a fee to have a sampling of every shipment tested for lead. This would end up adding to the price of the product, which it should, since "self monitoring" of Chinese products hasn't worked.It might put some jobs back inthe US and by evening the playing field.

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rlwr51Jan. 11, 09 1:46 PM

It is aparrent to anyone who is half-way paying attention that China has no regard for the health, safety or welfare of it's own people. Why would they care about anyone else, including us? Buying from China supports an inhumane system. And, does it surprise any one that retailers did so poorly over this last "holiday season". If people don't have jobs they're not going to buy goods no matter how cheap they are and no matter how much they push their credit.(We "bought now" and are "paying later".) Been there, done that, have the mug and the t-shirt.

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