High schools confront social media minefield

  • Article by: Katie Humphrey , Star Tribune
  • Updated: February 24, 2014 - 5:38 AM

Rumors, taunts abound on sites that offer anonymity.

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stplooklistnFeb. 23, 14 8:17 AM

And when there were no charges against that All-American boy from Rogers the attorney has the gall to ask what about the harm to the young man's reputation. Consequences kid. The world is full of them.

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bluedevil101Feb. 23, 14 8:54 AM

Stp: I totally agree. To heck with the teacher involved as long as the kid is OK. Hopefully she files a civil suit to wake the family up. Overall though, I don't believe that the 24 hour connectedness is good for anyone. We used to say good bye to our friends on Friday, see a few on Saturday and then see everyone again on Monday. Maybe talk on the phone over the weekend. But we had a break from the social gossip. Now, however, kids are texting and posting all night long. So many things are brought into the schools and into the streets. Too bad parents have relinquished control.

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RankenFyleFeb. 23, 14 9:04 AM

Yes, parents do need to be educated to the new technologies of social media; obviously, they're slower to assimilate to them. It's difficult to tell who is more immature, the users or the overseers. In the long run, the parents (and other adults, including the marketplace!) still must be held accountable for the actions of minor children. Access to certain technologies may need to be limited based on user age; after all, just because a nine year old may be able to turn an ignition key, we still don't let them drive the car. There may be freedom of speech issues involved, but we cannot grant freedom from responsibility.

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gohospitalFeb. 23, 14 9:06 AM

Let this stuff go full speed ahead. When the kids end up in "trouble" maybe the responsible parents will do something. It is not all cute and funny. It will come home to roost. Then the parents will HAVE to take the responsibility for their Children Someone will be hurt badly.

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teach2bwiseFeb. 23, 1410:04 AM

If schools and parents want to prepare their children for the 21st century, particularly the digital aspect, they not only need to teach impulse control, decency, and empathy but also hold them accountable for their actions with age appropriate consequences. For the All-American senior from Rogers, he should be expelled from school. If he is 18, all the more reason for him to figure out how to complete his high school career. They are plenty of alternatives-online school being one of them. In the grown-up workplace, one could very well be terminated for a "joke" of a sexual nature. Since the beginning of time teens have always wanted to be treated like adults but also coddled (which is different than being supported) like little kids especially when their decisions go awry. It is imperative when kids in middle school and high school learn to navigate the unfiltered digital world that adults provide them with continual guidance on how they express themselves online and support to help them cope with consequences of the occasional poor choice.

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antisuburbsFeb. 23, 1411:09 AM

Nothing has changed behavior-wise. The only difference is that with online social media, the evidence is right there, so the school staff can no longer look the other way when a student complains about being bullied. They actually have to do something about it.

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remoguyFeb. 23, 1412:20 PM

Unless the student uses school facilities or is on campus while engaging in the undesired behavior the school should have absolutely no concern with the students behavior. Increasingly the schools have attempted to control legal behavior after school hours or off-campus. This fascist behavior by politically correct school administrators must be stopped. If the student is doing something illegal, the police have the responsibility to act. There is never a situation where a school official should be allowed to restrict a student's legal, off-campus, after hours activity. Its time to stand up to these Nazis and say "enough is enough."

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star57Feb. 23, 1412:32 PM

I was shocked when an 8th grade teacher told me kids can have their phones in class as long as it's on top of their desk. How about leaving them in their lockers. If kids are tardy they need to call a parent. Also, watch out for Snapcrap (Snapchat), can be used as unregulated porn for kids.

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applejeffFeb. 23, 1412:50 PM

bluedevil, I agree with most everything you said, up until your last statement. While it's true that many parents/adults, heck most of us, have relinquished control and fail to hold people accountable, this isn't completely about that. There's a difference between relinquising control and not being able to retain some form of control. Face it, we don't have the ability to retain control of our kids 24/7/365. Nor should we. That's where values come in. We CAN do something about teaching and instilling a strong set of core values.

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pervertuiopFeb. 23, 1412:59 PM

The kids today have a high tech version of the megaphone. Be responsible or pay the consequences.

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