Minneapolis struggles to find practice space for soccer teams

  • Article by: Maya Rao , Star Tribune
  • Updated: February 4, 2014 - 7:12 AM

Indoor soccer fields are tough to find in Minneapolis, particularly for immigrants.

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ishikawaFeb. 3, 14 9:16 PM

Tax the non-immigrants and build more stadiums. Its only fair.

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ishikawaFeb. 3, 14 9:17 PM

Tax the non-immigrants and build more stadiums. Its only fair.

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BallFourFeb. 3, 14 9:19 PM

If only this was Minneapolis' biggest challenge.

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Minnesoda73Feb. 3, 14 9:27 PM

Soccer or "football" is great for these kids. When the snow is off the ground, they can use fields in the late evening or even midnight. A great form for cultural exchange and enrichment.

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rshacklefordFeb. 3, 1411:19 PM

The taxpayer paid landscape wart of a stadium will be sitting completely empty most of the year. Divide up the total available playing field area and have multiple games. Dayton and Kelm-Helgen didn't really think that Mpls is full of Sven and Oles, did they? And they did promise that the Peoples' Stadium would be multipurpose. Maybe with this they could keep just one of their promises?

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southwestmomFeb. 4, 1412:01 AM

This is a real problem in Minneapolis, however, it isn't just impacting Football/Soccer. Programs/Activites have been cut and left it up to "club programs" to find opportunities for kids to play at a more competitive level. We need to get away from club programs and focus on the non-profits. Cities shouldn't cut opportunities to make others wealthly playing the games they love, they should be helping their residents find opportunities to continue to participate in athletics. Basketball programs (i.e., www.mplslakers.org) encounter the same issues in the winter. In the Spring, Summer and Fall, baseball programs (i.e. www.myba.us) have a challenge securing fields for practice and games. It is a real problem in Minneapolis, as we don't have any comprehensive shared resources/facilities. Parks want to use the space for their endeavors/programs, schools want to make it available to their communities, and the churches save their space for their members. We really NEED to overhaul the system in order to provide opportunities for communities to collaborate and support the athletic programs that everyone wants and needs in our city! It is really ridiculous how much space is out there, but can't be used. Cities, like Edina support programs like those mentioned above, and they are almost solely funded by the tournaments, facilities and fees that people pay to participate. We can't even host a tournament as, we don't have the authority to host a tournament in Minneapolis. As a result many of these programs, can't afford to rent the space that they need. Why can't we get this done? No tournaments? The schools, Parks, etc... should AND could make this happen. Programs don't want something for nothing. Kids just want to play! Why can't we do this in Minneapolis? Todd Park--why couldn't that become a year round Sports Facility? That is just an example, all of the suburbs can do it and they are thriving, why can't we???

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kondiratorFeb. 4, 1412:13 AM

It seems like some outdoor hockey rinks don't get much use. Maybe the park boards could look at shifting funds to indoor soccer facilities. Maybe buy or rent unused warehouse space.

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jaynedrakeFeb. 4, 1412:13 AM

Everyone does not want all these kids programs. The Minneapolis Park Board is concentrating on other things. The Minneapolis School Board does not want all these kids programs. Why, maybe if we had them we would be competitive with the suburbs!!! But, to my mind, these groups do no care and most rich people don't care either.

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ajnaguyFeb. 4, 14 6:19 AM

I see two main problems: lack of real estate to build new pitches, but also the Park Board's seeming insistence that only some programs can use "their" fields, and preferentially at that. I teach middle school and go to games to support our kids. They routinely make our softball team play on a cruddy field, while a very nice one stands empty in the same park. Yet club teams (who, we assume, pay some fees) of the same age group are on the newer, nicer diamonds. Double standard.

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krump56Feb. 4, 14 6:23 AM

Life lesson. People with means have access to better education, health care, housing, and athletic facilities. And THEY pay for them. Winter access to indoor practice facilities is not a basic need and should not be paid for with tax dollars.

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