Minnesota wins grant to boost HPV vaccination rates

  • Article by: Rebecca Harrington , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 29, 2014 - 9:11 PM

The Minnesota Department of Health has received a $600,000 federal grant for a campaign to increase the state’s vaccination rates for human papilloma virus (HPV). Minnesota is one of seven states and four cities to receive the grants from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the agencies announced Wednesday.

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billybob8Jan. 29, 1410:57 PM

Most parents I know don't want this shot for their kids because of vaccine safety concerns. The HPV vaccine was rushed to market with an fast-tracked clinical trial. Now it's the vaccine with most reports filed in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Spend the $600,000 on a making a safer vaccine!

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smart18Feb. 1, 1412:02 AM

As a mother of two girls, this is frightening to me. If you are considering this for a family member, please educate yourself on this vaccine before allowing the government and health care providers to bully you into this vaccine. Here are the facts: •Merck’s Gardasil vaccine was studied for less than 2 years in about 1,200 children under age 16 before it was licensed in 2006. Gardasil was not studied in children with health problems or in combination with all other vaccines routinely given to American adolescents. Clinical trials did not use a true placebo to study safety but compared Gardasil against a bioactive aluminum containing placebo; •After Gardasil was licensed and three doses recommended for 11-12 year old girls and teenagers, there were thousands of reports of sudden collapse with unconsciousness within 24 hours, seizures, muscle pain and weakness, disabling fatigue, Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS), facial paralysis, brain inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, blood clots, optic neuritis, multiple sclerosis, strokes, heart and other serious health problems, including death, following receipt of Gardasil vaccine. •GlaxoSmithKline’s Cervarix vaccine, which has been used in Europe since 2007 and was licensed in the U.S. in 2009, contains a strong immuni stimulating AS04 adjuvant containing aluminum and MPL, which has never been used in U.S. vaccines. Cervarix was studied for less than 6 years in fewer than 1200 healthy girls under age15 and was not tested with a true placebo but was compared against Hepatitis A vaccine and other childhood vaccines that can cause serious reactions.

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