With doubts about lethal injection, some states consider returning to old-fashioned executions

  • Article by: JIM SALTER , Associated Press
  • Updated: January 28, 2014 - 4:10 PM

ST. LOUIS — With lethal-injection drugs in short supply and new questions looming about their effectiveness, lawmakers in some death penalty states are considering bringing back relics of a more gruesome past: firing squads, electrocutions and gas chambers.

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mplsstrwyJan. 28, 14 7:49 AM

"This isn't an attempt to time-warp back into the 1850s or the wild, wild West or anything like that," said Missouri state Rep. Rick Brattin, who this month proposed making firing squads an option for executions. "It's just that I foresee a problem, and I'm trying to come up with a solution that will be the most humane yet most economical for our state." Well, there you go: "most humane yet most economical." What more do you want?

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RankenFyleJan. 28, 14 8:35 AM

If it has to be humane and economical, how about the guillotine on pay per view broadcast? That ought to make some heads roll!

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texas_technomanJan. 28, 1410:36 AM

There should be no shortage of volunteers for the firing squads!

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EleanoreJan. 28, 1410:39 AM

Good idea.

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morbthrmsnowJan. 28, 1410:56 AM

capital punishment is unconstitutional!

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mobydick1Jan. 28, 1412:28 PM

The death penalty doesn't seem to be the answer. It doesn't seem to deter and by the time and expense is considered it is a net loss.

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formergopJan. 28, 14 1:01 PM

Thou shall not kill! Which one of the Ten Commandments was that again? Christian Conservatives pick and choose which parts of Bible they believe in.

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platinumJan. 28, 14 1:51 PM

Funny, Dennis McGuire raped and killed a pregnant woman, and we are worried about 28 minutes of his discomfort. I think that the obvious thing is if you don't want the discomfort of an execution, don't commit the crime.

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Joe BobJan. 28, 14 2:35 PM

Just abolish the death penalty and replace it with life without parole. What purpose does it serve to spend untold thousands of dollars and years of litigation on putting people to death? The way the penalty is applied, it’s basically arbitrary. Likewise, where is the deterrent effect when 10 to 20 years of appeals separate the crime from the punishment? Nevermind the fact that the Innocence Project has used DNA evidence to prove the actual innocence of no fewer than 18 people sentenced to death.

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nkuhlmanJan. 28, 14 2:38 PM

I have grave reservations about the death penalty in general. I suspect it is unequally applied, and its effectiveness as a deterrent to other would-be criminals is slim to none. However, I have to admit to feeling there are some circumstances where someone can walk away from the social compact so fully that they waive their right to participate in the protections that society offers. I can think of at least three Minnesota cases that would fit this. Nobody worries whether a rabid dog is 'guilty' of biting someone. That said, I can't see any reason why the chemical euthanasia approach now in favor is less cruel or less unusual than the guillotine, the noose, or the firing squad; nor really any advantage except if the executioner is having guilt issues. In any event, an execution is nothing to celebrate or take joy in. When we have passed that point, it will be yet another milestone of our descent into roman decadence.

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