Ramsey County adding license plate readers

  • Article by: Nicole Norfleet , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 24, 2014 - 11:04 PM

Sheriff’s Office and other east metro agencies plan to install the car-theft deterrents next month.

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  • Comments

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MorgJan. 24, 14 9:55 PM

Yet we can't have cameras to nail the brain dead imbeciles who ignore red lights...

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BroonieJan. 24, 1411:22 PM

License plate readers ought to work well in areas where there are lots of assaults, burglaries and robberies taking place. Query the files...let's see, how many cars don't belong in the neighborhood. Hm...

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greatxJan. 25, 1412:24 AM

"Yet we can't have cameras to nail the brain dead imbeciles who ignore red lights..."

There is nothing stopping you Morg, from putting up your own "red light camera". Red light cameras bring their own issues to the table. All it takes is a few minutes of using a search engine to find that of the many cities that tried red light cameras, most got rid of them in a year. Recently my adopted hometown of Colorado Springs installed some red light cameras, they didn't stay up six months...

As it turns out, a police officer has to look at each and every incident, and that is after the company that owns the camera drops half for questionable photos.

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bs6699Jan. 25, 14 1:16 AM

Only a tiny fraction (less than .01%)of cars are stolen, the justification for this massive invasion of privacy. As with NSA spying, this enables and encourages fishing rather than probable cause, without any oversight. They will be able to track far more than stolen vehicles with this technology. Time to call your local, state, and federal representatives and stop this before it goes any further. Truly Owellian Big Government at work.

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braxozJan. 25, 14 1:24 AM

Good luck reading the plates this winter - are they going to wash them or issue a ticket for unreadable plates (got one in St. Paul about 8 years ago)

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bsnam1Jan. 25, 14 8:36 AM

bs6699, "... the justification for this massive invasion of privacy." My thought exactly. This is nothing more than governments fear of the citizen. Remember folks, "Those Who Sacrifice Liberty For Security Deserve Neither." - B. Franklin

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equal4all55Jan. 25, 14 8:43 AM

"massive invasion of privacy" Give me a break. If you are not driving a stolen vehicle, you have nothing to worry about. We need to give law enforcement the tools they need to catch criminals.

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gopher971Jan. 25, 14 9:12 AM

BS6699 and bsnam1 are correct. Law enforcement assumes everyone is guilty, implements a massive new program to impose there unconstitutional policies on society. Result freedom and liberty are curtailed, but car thefts will not decline. Statistics prove such policies create smarter car thieves.

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eddie55431Jan. 25, 14 9:14 AM

Before any police force begins to use equipment to track the whereabouts and daily movements of all of it's citizens (and that's what this is), we need laws specifically describing the storage and use of this information. The rules and regulations are way behind the technical curve on this invasion of privacy. For example, if the records of your coming and going and where your car is parked should fall under FOIA then potential criminals, ex-lovers, or stalkers could access this information to determine someone's daily schedule. They just finished court cases where police records were accessed illegally, what is to stop this information regarding the movements of lawful citizens from being used for no good?

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clermont1095Jan. 25, 1411:23 AM

Wow, Josef Stalin in the old Soviet Union would have LOVED these things!

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