More Twin Cities suburbs are growing sweet on bees

  • Article by: Kelly Smith , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 21, 2014 - 7:49 AM

Foodies and environmentalists are adding hives.

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Minnesoda73Jan. 20, 14 9:17 PM

Bees are great!

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rlwr51Jan. 20, 1410:59 PM

It would help if people did not buy or plant anything treated with nicotinamide pesticide. It has been linked to the disappearance of bees and probably Monarch butterflies. It is on most bedding and garden plants that you buy at common nurseries. Most seeds are also treated with it. Ask. If people start demanding plants that aren't treated it would do some good.

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tituspulloJan. 20, 1411:27 PM

Love bees...I've done everything I can to make my rural property more attractive to bees. Glad to see some in the suburbs embracing the love as well.

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orvestaJan. 21, 1412:54 AM

Honeybees are so busy working they rarely if ever bother humans, unless the humans directly threaten their hive, meaning come within a couple feet and try to open or disturb it. Sad to say, countless people automatically blame honeybees for any and every insect incident they've had. It's very rare that somebody who has even a small understanding of honeybees is against them... The death of honeybee and pollinator species may signal the death of humans as a species.

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hammarhead1Jan. 21, 14 5:47 AM

Most people don't know the difference between a honey bee and a yellow jacket. Honey bees are very docile and almost never sting.

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ninetwelveJan. 21, 14 7:47 AM

It's intriguing to me that there have been and are several theories relating to the rise of colony collapse disorder and most are centered around an evil seed company, pesticide company, or cell phone tower...the irony is that Rudolph Steiner predicted (in 1923) that colony collapse would likely occur in approximately 80 years or as we like to call it today. I believe his point was one of bio-diversity or really genetic diversity or the lack thereof would cause problems. I'm not saying saying that pesticides, etc can't or don't harm bee populations, but I'm saying that we need to look at the big picture. Look also and especially at natural enemies of the bees (mites, beetles, and bee family trees that don't fork).

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orbit79Jan. 21, 14 8:50 AM

During high school and college, I worked six summers for a sunflower research company up here in lakes country. Many of our fields had honey bee hives/boxes installed once the flowers were in full bloom - better pollination for us; higher honey yields for the beekeepers! It was a win-win setup. And that perpetual hum of thousands of bees surrounding you - I miss that! But I just wanted to say that in those six years in the fields, I was only stung ONCE. And that was because the bee fell into my shirt collar and couldn't find its way out. Aside from little snafus like that, bees really don't bother you if you don't bother them. Bring 'em on and let's see 'em thrive!

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swmnguyJan. 21, 14 1:28 PM

I worked on a honey farm a few summers as a kid. I got stung a lot, mostly during harvesting and extraction. However, if you're not actively stealing the bee's honey and messing with the hive, you're very unlikely to get stung. Honeybees are very reluctant to sting. It pulls the stinger out of their body and they die. If they do sting you, you may be able to flick the stinger out of your body without squeezing the venom sac and then there's almost no harm at all. For people with allergies honeybees, even a lot of them, are far less of a danger than the wasps and yellowjackets and even "sweatbees" that are already all around.

I really like honeybees. Besides their integral place in our whole ecosystem and plant/food system, they're just cool animals. If a neighbor or somebody on my block wanted to raise bees I'd be all for it, if they knew what they were doing. It would be a great net benefit for all of us who garden here.

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davehougJan. 21, 14 5:37 PM

Hey folks, be kind, ask your neighbors if anyone has a bee allergy and share some honey. Any city council meeting goes better if neighbors are on board.

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