Why everyone seems to have cancer

  • Article by: GEORGE JOHNSON , New York Times
  • Updated: January 17, 2014 - 4:43 PM

Cancer rates aren’t rapidly rising. But this complicated disease is proving to be harder to combat than heart disease.

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sausageJan. 17, 14 5:14 PM

We are trying to find a cure for death. How long should any person live? If you are famous or a celebrity should you live longer? The popes live very long because they get the absolutely best medical and personal care. Should the poor have the same chance to a long life as the rich? You all have some very interesting things to consider. Me? I want to live only until GOD wants me to, not man!

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radagastJan. 17, 14 5:18 PM

Why people want to cling to life until their mind goes and their body is a decrepit wreck in a nursing home bed is beyond me. I've seen enough of that to know it's not what I want for me, and I don't know why anyone would want it for a loved one. Quality of life matters more than longevity. If I make it into the 75-85 age range, I'll be happy enough to check out before real decrepitude sets in. No extraordinary measures, just get out of the way and let me make a graceful exit (hopefully with Pink Floyd's discography playing me out :D).

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MellersJan. 17, 14 7:58 PM

Many young people get cancer. A lot of them are being treated and cured, myself included. At the age of 28 7 years ago, modern medicine cured my Leukemia that might have been a death sentence a couple of decades prior. I'm not immune from other cancers in my future, but I'm SO glad I get a future!!

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I'll say this about thatJan. 18, 14 7:19 AM

Everybody wants to go to heaven, Nobody wants to die!

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ruphinaJan. 18, 14 7:59 AM

Interesting attributing the mutations to evolution, when they can only reproduce in the body they develop in, and die with it, thus demonstrating a peculiar lack of survival of the fittest. Bill G.

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elind56Jan. 18, 14 8:35 AM

Suppose the magic bullet is discovered, the big 'C' goes the way of smallpox, and, barring accidental death, we can all expect to live well into our nineties and beyond with all the accompanying mental and physical deterioration that goes along with it. Careful what you wish for. Until major strides are made in keeping our mental and physical capabilities in decent working order at the age of 95 or 100, the ability to prevent and/or cure cancer would relegate most of us to the specter of spending our last couple of decades wasting away in a state of mental delirium and physical emaciation with younger generations sacrificing their quality of life in order to pay for us to be warehoused.

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JMarvinJan. 18, 14 9:19 AM

I agree, elind. What quality of life might there be for a person whose mind and/or physical ability is severely deteriorated? In my work, I visit those in nursing homes on a regular basis, some are there for years and years, (one Alzheimers patient was there for 10 years), It is hard to gauge suffering in those who have totally lost their minds, but in the mildly demented and physically disabled, the suffering is obvious. I can say that this is precisely what I don't want for myself. I would rather be let go quietly with as little pain as possible.

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k11m11p11Jan. 18, 14 9:24 AM

I know many people who are younger than 55 (and are not overweight, take good care of themselves, etc.), who've gotten cancer - particularly breast cancer. Some died from it. I find it hard to believe that environmental/food toxins don't play a significant part. And "... the ability to prevent and/or cure cancer would relegate most of us to the specter of spending our last couple of decades wasting away in a state of mental delirium and physical emaciation with younger generations sacrificing their quality of life in order to pay for us to be warehoused." - Do you think dying from cancer is more preferable to this? My cousin's death from breast cancer (in her early 40s) didn't include much delirium except at the end, but it sure included years of emaciation and a slow wasting away. I guess some people are more interested in protecting their own pocketbooks than in how to properly, effectively, and compassionately care for the medically and mentally fragile in our society. If you don't die from cancer, it doesn't automatically mean you'll have mental delirium and physical emaciation; I have many relatives who were physically mentally fine all of their elder years, and died peacefully one night in their sleep.

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bluebird227Jan. 18, 14 9:34 AM

The important thing is to feel good today because you could get sick tomorrow. Exercise, eat right, avoid stress, and surround yourself with people who make you feel good. Balance the guilty pleasures with taking care of yourself to keep a positive outlook and enjoy life.

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mnpls123Jan. 18, 1410:23 AM

I wonder where we'd be if previous generations had a why bother attitude when they found cures for diseases that no longer kills us. All they did was help us live longer to get heart disease and cancer.

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