Rosenblum: 'Divorce Corp.' is stark reminder of high costs of U.S. breakups

  • Article by: GAIL ROSENBLUM , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 13, 2014 - 8:22 PM

It’s a safe bet that nobody attending a Twin Cities screening of “Divorce Corp.” on Sunday night would use the word “surprising” to describe it.

  • 23
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
jacksoncageJan. 14, 14 9:17 AM

As someone who formerly worked in the system, the problem often lies with the participants themselves. Typically one spouse has decided the marraige is over and the other spouse hasn't arrived there yet. As such, that spouse gets caught in the "anger" stage while the other is in acceptance. THus, it's the "anger" spouse that wants to reek havoc, regardless of the cost or consequences.

10
3
smit1143Jan. 14, 1411:07 AM

I'm a family law attorney. The system is flawed, no question. However, for every "nightmare" case that involves multiple motion hearings, complex custody evaluations, and ugly trials, there are ten that are resolved through court sponsored mediation, neutral evaluation and similar programs. Believe it or not, most attorneys aren't ultra aggressive and truly do want what is best for their clients. Also - there are very serious drawbacks to "collaborative" law, which often ends up being even more expensive than the traditional process. Do your research in selecting an attorney and process prior to starting a divorce, and chances are it will be fine.

6
4
akornJan. 14, 1411:46 AM

" ...when then California Gov. Ronald Reagan created the country’s first no-fault-divorce.

We need to pay less attention to the "system," and look more closely at the law itself. Marriage has always been a contract. You do not just walk away from a contract without showing cause. If you do, you should expect to pay a severe penalty to the party you have contracted with. With the "no-fault" (should be called "unilateral")divorce laws of the 70s, the contract aspect of marriage was abandoned. A spouse could walk away from a marriage for no good reason whatsoever -- and take along the kids as well as a significant chunk of her partner's paycheck for many years into the future. This amounts to an incentive to divorce, and the results have been catastrophic for American children, families, and society.

Forget about greedy lawyers and inept judges. What we need to do is repeal no-fault divorce and return marriage laws to the contract system upon which they have been historically based.

11
3
tabasco628Jan. 14, 1412:58 PM

Just as the marriage industry will benefit from gay marriage, so will the divorce industry.

6
0
dad4lifeJan. 14, 14 2:07 PM

I know people here in MN with stories similar to those in the movie. Anyone who's lost a family member from a family court decision or who's been targeted by an attorney-led self-serving parent in a custody case, knows the system is deeply flawed and profoundly costly to everyone. Reforming family law begins by assuming both parents are equal unless clear objective criteria are met.

8
0
mnbusdrJan. 14, 14 3:51 PM

From personal experience I can say that divorce is indeed a highly profitable industry. The system knows exactly what assets are available and it is no coincidence that all of the fees to the attorneys, appraisers, mediators, child custody evaluators and parenting consultants require just as much money as there happens to be. Once the money is gone, these "professionals" quickly lose interest and the divorce is miraculously completed in short order. Funny how that works.

10
1
lawyerguyJan. 14, 14 4:33 PM

Things in Minnesota are actually getting somewhat better in Minnesota. However, virtually every "high conflict" expensive marriage dissolution becomes that way because of the litigious spouses. Believe it or not, I have better things to do than spend hours on the phone or drafting affidavits on weekends because people can't agree when to exchange custody, where there children will spend holidays or what extracuricular activities can be scheduled during the other parents custody period. Admittedly, there are some attorneys out there who allow willing clients to pursue scorched earth litigation. Frankly, most of these attorneys are zealots that any rational person of either gender will smell out. Yet, these attorneys don't prod unwilling clients down this path--they take angry spouses and encourage them. Before criticizing attorneys, judges and custody evaluators people involved in costly marriage dissolutions should take a long look in the mirror to see who is really to blame for the high cost of divorce. It is also vitally important that family law not intrinsically favor one gender over another. Here, we have actually made great strides during the past decade but would benefit from presuming that each fit parent should have an equal caretaking role in his or her childrens lives.

3
0
vincent70Jan. 14, 14 4:48 PM

Dear lawyer guy have you look at what the state of Washington put into place concerning physical and legal custody? It forces the parents to find a solution, The reason why there is conflict is MONEY. More custody more money. Take the money incentive out of the picture and start the parents at 50/50 physical custody. Watch the conflict go away

9
0
mnbusdrJan. 14, 14 5:06 PM

It's interesting that the comments from the Family Law professionals follow a common theme, to wit: "It's not my fault! It's the fault of the stupid and foolish people who are my customers! If only they were as smart and sophisticated about these things as I am!" Of course, most of those people have never had a lawyer before, have never even been exposed to the legal system in any way, have no idea of the process, and are anxious, upset, and don't know what to do. They trust the "professionals", who are more than happy to keep stirring the pot---in the "best interest" of their foolish and stupid clients, of course. These professionals all say they have "better things to do", so evidently the enormous amount of money they make from their foolish clients is really just an enormous burden the Family Law professional must bear.

9
0
lawyerguyJan. 14, 14 6:56 PM

mnbusdr--Actually, I spend a good deal of my time trying to convince some of my clients to behave like adults rather than children. For this, I face endless repetitive argument and criticism because "I'm not on their side." Another great share of my time is spent addressing petty and juvenile behavior by my client or his/her spouse. Want a handful of examples? One wife, angry that her husband was awarded his mother's china sold it at a flea market. Another client feels he needs more holidays with the children than his ex wife because his celebrations are "more important." That is balanced by another client whose ex wife feels Christmas eve is an overnight when its her year but ends at 9pm on his year. One client received 62 phone calls from his wife on a single day inquirying about the children's welfare. Another client sent salacious portions of deposition testimony (about her husband's affair) to his 80 plus year old mother. Every one of these incidents cost the parties thousands of dollars in attorney fees. I can assure you that none of this behavior was counseled or encouraged by legal professionals.

6
1

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: Can the Wild rally to win its playoff series against Colorado?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT