Docs ready for wave of new MNsure patients

  • Article by: Jeremy Olson , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 12, 2014 - 6:57 AM

Doctors, care centers feel ready for any influx of the newly enrolled.

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gemie1Jan. 11, 1410:41 PM

Most doctors and clinics will see an increase in patients, but not Mayo Clinic. Most insurance plans do not cover Mayo, but they will still get the Medicare, limited amount of Medicaid and people like the Governor.

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Wally_99Jan. 11, 1410:44 PM

But they are not ready to have 1/2 to 2/3 the reimbursement rates they happily had with commercial insurers. Medicare and Medicaid-dominated cases are going to cut their salaries by a non-trivial amount. It is going to truly be the acid test of the Hippocratic Oath.

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rayk1800Jan. 12, 1412:03 AM

Other then a checkup, I don't plan on using my insurance. So I pay $501 a month for a decent policy because If I needed medical care, my assets won't be used up. If I was a insurance company, I would be busy enrolling everyone I could. If they enroll a million policies, that's good for probably 400 million in revenues annually. The majority of policy holders won't use insurance that often anyways.

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comment229Jan. 12, 14 4:47 AM

acid test of the Hippocratic Oath..... over the years, that oath has been tested by more and more layers of bureaucracy.... MnSure and the ACA has put a band aid on the problem; for some, not all, but the main problems of health care in this country remain. And the main problem right now is not people losing their health insurance even though that is what they will say. When it gets deep in that discussion, it always, 100% of the time, comes down to money. The Hippocratic Oath is still there, but I dare you to try to discuss it with a hospital administrator and get to listen to the lecture you will get back.... I have.

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comment229Jan. 12, 14 4:54 AM

PS... In a local paper, the local gop congressman listed out everything he could think of to lambast the health care system in Minnesota in particular, and then went on to list out, paragraph by paragraph, every single remedial intervention that the gop have stated. I didn't disagree with one of those items on the list. My question; why hasn't he introduced every single one of them? They would only complement the ACA legislation, and would be good for the country. But if he did this, I would ask that he separate all the concepts into separate bills before the U.S. Congress, so we could see what legislators and lobbyists support each unique bill. The American public should have a right to know...... and why.

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paddlemanJan. 12, 14 6:18 AM

gemie1, are you sure about the Mayo coverage, I think this is a real misnomer that "most" insurance plans don't cover Mayo.

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comment229Jan. 12, 14 7:12 AM

paddleman: I won't try to speak for any others, but there is a reason why only one insurance company bid the Rochester zip code. Eventually, a deal was negotiated, with a disclaimer from a couple of commissioners, who stated (paraphrasing here) that they will allow other insurance companies to re-bid after the deadline, but only for Rochester.... and then the behind the scenes negotiations which took the Mayo clinic out of the primary provider list. That is what my policy states. Now, I don't mind.... I don't have any desire to go to the Mayo Clinic, and am tickled to have Olmstead as my provider. What I resent, is that I have to pay 2.5 times more for my premium than a person in my exact situation in the metro area (eight) because of the Mayo proximity (area one), even though I will never ever step foot in any of their buildings or hospitals.... Now Rochester residents have more choices, but Mayo, is not one of them, UNLESS they go to a primary provider who refers them to Mayo. THAT is the way I understood the compromise to be.... Now, who do you suppose is responsible for not wanting to do the primary care?

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nonewtaxesJan. 12, 14 7:17 AM

gemie1-get your facts right about the Mayo Clinic.

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godiveJan. 12, 14 8:05 AM

Let me get this right. I find it already difficult to schedule an appointment. No new doctors have been added because of obamacare and in fact many have been retiring because of low reimbursement and beauacracy. So adding tens of thousands of medicare patients I a good thing and clinics are ready? Good luck with scheduling your next appointment.

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swmnguyJan. 12, 14 8:11 AM

People aren't going to go to the doctor all the time just because they have insurance. I go to the doctor once every other year, and my 2 kids less than that, now that they've had all their vaccines. For most health issues basically healthy people deal with, there's no point going to the doctor anyway, and a Minute Clinic (or similar) can do the same things for far less money.

What insuring people will do is save people from bankruptcy and complete destitution if they do get a serious health issue. Like the woman in the story who is supposed to spend $102,000 a year on a drug regimen. Yeah, right. No wonder alternative medicine is growing in popularity in the US. Who has that kind of money to either get the conventional treatment or to fight their insurance company to get the coverage they pay for?

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