The Drive: How to get around during the polar plunge

  • Article
  • Updated: January 4, 2014 - 7:30 PM

As the latest arctic blast brings the coldest temperatures seen in the Twin Cities in nearly two decades, AAA is bracing for an onslaught of calls from stranded motorists, and transit agencies are calling in extra staff to drive buses and trains and to fix the ones that break down.

  • 6
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 6 of 6
lucky2bmeJan. 5, 14 8:07 AM

When is Metro Transit going to have an app for that???

1
1
owatonnabillJan. 5, 14 9:05 AM

So is today the day that hell officially freezes over, or what? For an article purporting to provide information on how to get around, this one is miserably lacking in anything substantial. So here's some info from a REAL Minnesotan on how to get around by auto in this GAWDAWFUL UNBEARABLE TOTALLYFREAKINDANGEROUS cold. (1) First of all, if you're from anywhere south of I-90, don't leave the house. You're probably so traumatized by this endless sky-is-falling swill coming from the Strib that you'd be dangerous in any case. (2) If you plan on driving, drive off the top of your tank. Keeping it full or nearly full stops condensation if you go into someplace like a heated garage and then back out in the cold, which can cause gas line icing. If you're still worried toss a can of fuel system anti-icer in. It won't help (all most of those things are is alcohol anyway and just about all gasoline nowadays has far too much alcohol in it anyway) but you'll FEEL better about it all. Oh, by the way--if your car lives outside, don't worry. If your fuel line isn't frozen already it won't freeze now. (3) Just about newer cars will start with no problem, with their fuel injection and all, no matter what the cold here in MN. Just don't be a moron and start pumping the gas pedal if the machine turns over slow. To do so merely produces more problems like the odor of gasoline, service calls, missed work days and high blood pressure. (4) Have along (and wear) enough clothes for GAWDsakes. You probably don't look that good dressed to the height of fashion anyway so a pair of mukluks and a fur-lined parka isn't going to hurt. (5) Take along a candle in a fireproof container. They provide enough heat to stay alive if the car stalls. Just don't be a moron (again) and do so with all the windows closed. Lack of oxygen can kill you just as dead as cold can. (6) If you DO end up outside for whatever reason, pain from the cold in your fingers, toes, ears, etc. is a GOOD thing. That means they're still alive. If they STOP hurting, then worry. Worry even more if things start falling off. A good way to prevent this is to stop being so damned cheap and get a few of those little heat packs from Fleet Farm or something. They work great but don't put them next to your skin unless first-degree burns are something you enjoy.

13
0
unreal09Jan. 5, 1410:37 AM

Owatannabill - Thank you for your information.

2
0
bosshogJan. 5, 1412:00 PM

01/30/2004 - low temp was -24F in Minneapolis, that is only 10 years ago. 01/16/2007 low temp -22F.

2
0
carstensJan. 5, 14 4:35 PM

Owatonnabill - you just saved me some money on fuel system de-icers. Thanks for the info!

0
0
markerminnJan. 6, 1411:17 AM

And make sure your car's heating system is not in recirculation mode. Most of the people you see driving around with frosted up windows don't realize that they are trapping the moisture from their breath inside the car - and it freezes on the inside of the windows.

0
0
  • 1 - 6 of 6

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: Who will win the Wild-Colorado playoff series?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT