Report: More than 40 presidents at private colleges top $1 million in pay and benefits

  • Article by: KIMBERLY HEFLING , Associated Press
  • Updated: December 15, 2013 - 8:13 PM

WASHINGTON — Presidents at 42 private colleges scaled the $1 million annual mark in total pay and benefits in 2011 — a slight bump from the year before, according to a survey based on the latest federal tax information from the 500 private schools with the largest endowments.

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jeffportDec. 15, 13 8:57 PM

No Duh... Why do you think tuition's are so high.. it's paying for all the high priced administrators, teachers/professors etc etc.....

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turgidDec. 15, 13 9:03 PM

No doubt they are all working 3 times as hard as the President of the United States.

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ottlukkDec. 15, 13 9:06 PM

Perhaps a fairer way to compensate the "presidents" of these private colleges would be to cap their pay at the cost of a four year education at their institutions?

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elmore1Dec. 15, 13 9:20 PM

Colleges need to be regulated just like the credit card industry. The predatory practices and lack of disclosure of where money goes, graduation rates, debt rates, employment rates, productivity indicators, etc is disgraceful. This applies to all colleges. The best way to drive the right behavior in the public space is to limit govt funding to those colleges that are doing the right things and cut off funding to bloated colleges like the U. Student debt is the next Wall Street or housing crisis and now is the time to take action.

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mariezzDec. 15, 13 9:35 PM

The number of administrators as a percentage of total student body has been growing at quite a high rate in the last 10-15 years, and they tend to have fairly high salaries. Meanwhile, the number of professors (including asst and assoc) has been decreasing and their salaries on average have not grown once inflation is factored in. Students are also demanding lots of services and lots of bells & whistles in terms of residence hall amenities, sport facilities amenities, and so on. All of these things are very expensive, but students on the whole still will strike many schools off their lists if such amenities are not provided. Providing additional services that were not provided as extensively just 20 years ago, including disability support services (required by federal law and the number of students requesting special testing conditions and so on is growing quickly), and free counseling services, are all quite costly too.

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supervon2Dec. 15, 13 9:37 PM

Where is the "Occupy Campus" movement during this time?

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sailing64Dec. 15, 1310:18 PM

If you don't like the costs of these private institutions, you have a choice. It's called public.

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JRBDec. 15, 1310:25 PM

I have absolutely no problem with private colleges paying whatever amount they feel their administrators deserve. If they grossly overpay, forcing them to raise tuitions to uncompetitive levels and therefore attract fewer students, that becomes their problem. But when it comes to taxpayer-supported public institutions (like the U of M for example) I do have a problem with both outrageous salaries and "administrative bloat" which all taxpaying Minnesota citizens are forced to pay for.

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bigtmnDec. 15, 1310:46 PM

"Perhaps a fairer way to compensate the "presidents" of these private colleges would be to cap their pay at the cost of a four year education at their institutions?" .... Wouldn't that be an incentive to raise tuition so their salaries would be higher?

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mdachsDec. 16, 1312:16 AM

For those of you expressing envy and dismay at these salaries, many of the top-paying private universities are among the top universities in the world. The U. of Chicago, for instance, is a top world class university. And I have no problem with the president making $3 million+ per year. Graduates of this university, both undergraduates and graduate, are in great demand by top employers and are often top performers at their employers. A private university is like a private company - it has the right to determine the pay of all of its employees, including its top executives. As mentioned by others, students have a choice as to whether they want to pay to attend a world class university. Get over it.

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