State releases long-awaited impact statement for PolyMet mine, opens public comment period

  • Article by: Josephine Marcotty , Star Tribune
  • Updated: December 7, 2013 - 3:26 PM

The DNR released forecast of proposed copper mine’s potential impact on northeast Minnesota.

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gutshotDec. 6, 1310:18 AM

Buckle up!! Here we go!!!!

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jimmybobbyDec. 6, 1310:53 AM

Selling our patrimony to a foreign owned company for some lowly mining jobs. They won't even deposit the likely environmental cleanup costs up front because they want to keep the option of filing for bankruptcy after all the value has been sucked out of the mine and all we are left with is pools of sulfuric acid laced water that will require treatment lasting 10 lifetimes. Sounds like a great deal.... for a third world country.

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sek2undrstndDec. 6, 1311:18 AM

I just read an article about the effects of this type of mining on the water supply of a small town. Suffice it to say, I wouldn't want to be downstream from one of these mines.

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viktorvaughnDec. 6, 1311:23 AM

This area needs jobs badly. The boom/bust iron mining cycle has made the Range a difficult place to scrape together a living.

Yet, we need to take the long view here. Maybe the mine will be able to contain the sulfuric acid in the tailing ponds for the next couple decades when the mine is open, but Polymet has no intention to maintain this site for the next five hundred years. Their business model is dependent on leaving a long term toxic mess for the public to deal with. If we made them pay up-front for clean-up costs, this mine would not be viable.

In addition to the current residents, we need to think of future residents. What will Hoyt Lakes be like when resident's wells are polluted with arsenic?

Polymet has never mined anything, anywhere. The money is being put up by Glencore, the 12th largest company in the world with a legacy of pollution across the globe. When they're done with the mine, Glencore takes the money, Polymet goes bankrupt, and Minnesotans clean up the mess. That's how this works.

Minnesota, we can do better.

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supervon2Dec. 6, 1311:38 AM

This will be the best pump for good jobs for years and years to come and the people putting this together are skilled and knowlegable in the mining industry. This is necessary for the continuation of our countries quality of life and continued ability to supply our own needs.

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stevensp0Dec. 6, 1311:39 AM

The same barons of industry who took all of our virgin white pine and all of the high grade iron ore are now looking to take the nonferous ores. You show me the high and mighty legacy of these earlier barons, and I might be interested in seeing this new bunch start a mine. But, in fact, all I see are scrub forests, abandoned pits and rail lines, and a few surviving taconite firms scratching to make a living. All of the big money, and power brokers, came and left and built their fortunes on our resources. Do you really believe they won't do it again? Do you really believe that Polymet will be around to clean up the mess they create in 150 years, or the 500 that is mentioned in the EIS. Do you? Let the ore lie where it is until we have a perfect,non polluting way to remove the 1% of rock that has value. The Rockefellers and Carnegies of today have other places to rape and ruin. If you think that the risk of this mine and its polluted legacy is worth 300 jobs, you are not reasoning. You are bought.

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viktorvaughnDec. 6, 1311:44 AM

We do need these sulfur bearing metals for our gizmos and gadgets. Yet, the first place we need to mine these metals is all those electronics we throw away. Laptops seem to last me about three years and phones even less. Manufacturers of these products should take them back at the end of their useful life. If they know they're taking them back, they'll make the components easier to recycle.

I'm skeptical we'd even need much more of these metals if we didn't treat what we've already mined as disposable. The prices have been recently dropping as demand has softened. However, if we do need more, they need to be mined in dryer environments where there's a much better chance to contain the acid mine drainage.

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breasonableDec. 6, 1311:52 AM

Lots of experts here who have never even seen a mine or even worked in one. I worked in one for 6 years, and I am far from an expert, so what does that make you?

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potter101Dec. 6, 1311:53 AM

supervon2Dec. 6, 1311:38 AM This will be the best pump for good jobs for years and years to come and the people putting this together are skilled and knowlegable in the mining industry. This is necessary for the continuation of our countries quality of life and continued ability to supply our own needs.**************************I always wonder about these issue when someone is calling for this to go through because of the quality of his life today. While the cost of these programs is a burden on their grand children. Unless you can tell me of a place in the world that mines at this level and doesn't destroy the local and state environment.

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gutshotDec. 6, 1311:56 AM

95% of all the copper used today is from recycled -- it doesn't wear out.

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