Alexander: How to get around e-mail blocking

  • Article by: STEVE ALEXANDER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: November 26, 2013 - 5:19 PM

Q: When I send out work-related e-mails, they are returned as undeliverable by Spamcop.net or Spamhaus.org.

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fuhrmannNov. 28, 13 6:20 AM

Even if this resolves itself, you should take there advice - permanently! If you are paying them big bucks to host a business site and email, they are not doing their job if they don't do everything they can to get your mail out. If you are a home business or just an occasional user of home email for work, what happens if your email address goes away permanently? not good. If you are a home business, wouldn't it be better to have an email address that looks like a business? Gmail (and I suspect that others also) can take care of that. A non-ISP provided email account is yours regardless of what ISP you use. The current trend (started by Gmail) is that they save all your email except for spam and ones that you specify to get rid of forever (or until you use up a really huge space. I have been with them for about 8 years and am using about 3 gig of the 15 that they allow me). Gmail can take all the mail going to your ISP account and copy it into your Gmail account so that anyone who uses your old address still gets mail to you. Gmail can be set up to use an email address that you purchase from a registrar so you can have a personalized business address or multiple addresses to separate business from home. Gmail lets you use mail software on your computer (such as Outlook or another reader) AND use their online interface whenever you are on the road or want to see an old message that you deleted from your computer. This probably makes the abilities of your ISP (which is also currently failing to do their basic job) look pretty pathetic. It might be time to say "I am following your suggestion, completely" then start to publicize your new email address. After you have everyone moved to the new one, you can consider what provider does the best for you without worrying about what happens to your emails.

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