Group home's Credit River neighbors are furious over surprise arrival

  • Article by: David Peterson , Star Tribune
  • Updated: November 29, 2013 - 2:04 PM

An angry group of Credit River Township residents say they were not informed of the arrival of a group home for the developmentally disabled.

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tmetalNov. 27, 1312:52 PM

Welcome to the club. Consider yourself lucky. I have 2 homes with a capacity of 4 each. Developmentally disabled my butt! They ruined our neighborhood. From '07-'11 one "client" had 60 police reports. Mostly for running away and aggressive panhandling at Cub and Target. You should ask the group home for a copy of the house rule's. Which I doubt they have any! At our group home it was anything goes including beer and marijuana on the front step. No one is ever "informed". These businesses have to sneak into neighborhoods because everyone would complain. Get used to being angry. Especially not knowing what lives next door. I found out I have a convicted sexual offender across from me. Have fun with all the traffic too. Not just the emergency responders, but the staff,county aid workers, metro transit and contract maintenance services. Remember the state dictates to the county and the county dictates to the city and township. Hold your nose like the rest of us. -BPCrimewatch

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freckles72Nov. 27, 13 2:24 PM

NIMBY at work. And yes, I have 2 group homes in my neighborhood so I too have to deal with some of these issues but the bottom line is these are human beings who have significant problems but still need housing and care. I often find the people who complain about the group homes are the same people who are "pro-life" as long as it doesn't interfere with their perfect neighborhoods and life. With cooperation and understanding a lot of the problems disappear. Life is messy -- even in fancy suburban neighborhoods.

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bzlady4uNov. 27, 13 5:07 PM

The option to keeping these type of people in our community based home settings is to re open the state hospitals. It surprises me that the companies who operate these homes are not able to adequately determine which residents are likely to leave unattended.

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chuckdancerNov. 28, 13 6:09 AM

It's not all bad news. Remember the landlord gets his money and the people running the home gets paid with checks they know are good as gold from the taxpayers. What I was most surprised about in this article was the description of Credit River Township as "upscale". I didn't realize my farmer cousins were surrounded by wealthy commuters and land speculators. That is much more harmful than a group home in a hayfield.

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plnewsjunkieNov. 28, 13 8:17 AM

This article, the neighbor quotes, and a few of these comments have blown my mind! I dont live too far from this neighborhood an am shocked to hear this feedback, do we now live in a time where you are more valuable than the next human being? I read they are developmentally disabled, not sex offenders (would be public info, if so) or murderers, you people should be ashamed of yourselves. Do they belong under the bridge because they are different from you? You have more authority to live in Credit River than them? Im confused. This isnt the 1800s where a mob of ignorant folk can run them out of town. It is completely legal! Hats off to those human service workers at that house for the tough job of helping others while being scrutinized by the neighborhood in which should be welcoming them and making those out of home residents feel like they belong. Chances are, they are wonderful people and maybe you would know that if you gave them a chance instead of shunning them. May God bless you all who feel the urge to push such hatred on something doing great things for other human beings.

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arspartzNov. 28, 13 6:25 PM

This is a different type of NIMBY. If I wanted to build anything remotely industrial in your town, I would be buried under paperwork by the permitting process. Even commercial development has constraints. All of theses type of developments have public input. State law PROHIBITS a city from controlling where someone wants to plant a group home. Any area zone single family residential MUST have group home of up to 4 "clients" as an allowed use. Any district that allows multifamily housing must allow up to 8 "clients." There is no limit to how many group homes can be built, nor are there any limits of how close together they can be. A small town can quickly be inundated with special needs folks. BTW, they are usually owned by a non-profit that pays its principals very well, but itself pays no property tax to help fund the public services they disproportionately use.

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falngfrmgracNov. 28, 13 7:13 PM

Grow up all of you! The state has mandates that these homes have to follow. When one person gets out of line the people in charge can't touch them even to control them. Most have a mental disability with medication. They just want to be loved. Most go to work every day also. I worked in a home and the clients are very fun to work with. We are to let them help prepare meals, help with laundry and cleaning and even shower themselves if they can. They have parties with other homes, celebrate all holidays with each other. Try and help with grocery shopping. If there is beer and drugs that would be the hired help! The problem is the pay! around $9 starting pay.

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LittleEvaDec. 4, 1311:59 AM

I have three group homes within a mile of me (one on the same block), built or remodeled single family homes within the last 4 years. They are well-maintained and not an eyesore. It would not have been my choice because of the traffic increase but I have not seen any problems. They may not be developmentally disabled. I have worked in a group home for physically disabled people before, some with borderline mental problems. It was not a bad place to work. We need to pay the staff more because the turnover is too high in the industry.

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