Statins vs. diet: Key to health is eating right

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  • Updated: November 19, 2013 - 5:37 PM

Yes, some people need drugs, but many more need to change what they eat.

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davidpalmerNov. 19, 13 6:26 PM

A low fat diet can reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Unfortunately it is too late for many people and they need medication like statins to reduce their risk and other people are unwilling to change their diet. A doctor loses credibility as a spokesperson when they start hawking their "remedies" in an op-ed piece. Don't patronize this profiteer.

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owatonnabillNov. 20, 13 7:24 AM

Only in America is it acceptable to pester our doctors for drugs to combat the effects of our bad habits, so that we can continue merrily along indulging in those habits. And it is not just cholesterol. Fat as a pig? well, there's always gastric bypass or liposuction when hoisting your body in and out of a bathtub becomes a job for a crane. Enjoy anonymous strings-free sex? Well the good Lord did invent antibiotics to combat the various critters we might come home with and just WHEN will an AIDS vaccine be developed, right? Enjoy getting bleepfaced about every other day or so? Hell, "treatment" (sooooooooo much more tolerable a word than "drying out") is available through almost any medical facility these days and of course insurance pays. And so on. We're a society that values excuses over responsibility and nowhere is this more apparent than in how we (mis)treat our bodies.

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rlundl02Nov. 20, 13 9:29 AM

@owatonnabill: I'm don't think my decision to go on statins at my doctors advice a couple years ago makes me irresponsible. Dropped my cholesterol immediately and now its down to safe levels. High cholesterol runs in my family and all the exercise and the oatmeal I ate five days a week could push it 10 maybe points in the right direction in a given year. Prescription costs about $5 a month. Shoulda done it earlier.

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mainepersonNov. 20, 13 9:58 AM

davidpalmer - I'm a customer of TruhealthMD.com and I can tell you the products have made a big difference in my health, helping me lower my LDL, lose weight, etc. Your attack on Dr. Klodas is unfair. As the article says, she does prescribe statins! You're attacking a little start-up company, but not multi-billion dollar multinational drug companies?

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vikings2016Nov. 20, 1310:06 AM

rlund, I don't think you got the point. Dr. Klodas says here she does prescribe statins, so she doesn't think you're irresponsible. I think she's just saying there's got to be another way to try to keep however many millions off statins.

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harvey3883Nov. 20, 1310:24 AM

Seems reasonable. What's wrong with starting a company to help people?

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jennyf02Nov. 20, 13 1:11 PM

What's the problem, davidpalmer? Lots of docs start businesses - why can't this one? The question is does her stuff work? I'm interested in that.

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davidpalmerNov. 20, 13 9:01 PM

You folks have no clue about ethics and medicine. To use your position as a physician to sell products you have a financial interest in to your patients is considered unethical. MDs cannot not own any interest in a pharmacy for the same reason. These remedies undoubtedly have not been subject to double-blind placebo controlled testing like statins. To use an op-ed piece to promote some potion from which you profit is sleazy and unethical even if it is technically legal. Most of these "nutritional " cures are just combinations of vitamins and make-believe nutrients. In other words they typically are bogus and someone's anecdotal testimony is worthless from a evidentiary perspective. All but 2 statins are now generic so the vast majority of statins are not coming form "multi-billion dollar multi-national drug companies" but smaller generic manufacturers. The new guidelines are already controversial because the method used to calculate risk is complicated and by no means proven to be cost effective. It may result in millions taking statins who will not benefit.

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mandansmomNov. 20, 13 9:41 PM

I agree with you davidpalmer. I've been a nurse for decades, and the idea that a doctor would promote their own "side business" in the course of handing out medical advice has always been considered sleazy, if not downright unethical. If this doctor recommended a particular brand of statin, in which she had a finacial stake, she could be charged with fraud.

People who wish to eat a healthy diet have many, many resources. When a vulnerable person enters a doctor's office, they should get sound, evidence-based advice. They should not get a commercial for an individual doctor's line of meals, vitamins, potions, lotions, or supplements. If the products are sound, patients can go into the market place and find/choose them independently.

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patrick198Nov. 20, 1310:01 PM

David & Mandansmom, I hear what you're saying, but what about other doctors who have created for-profit entities? Dr. Oz? The South Beach MD? Many others? These are multi-millionaires. As far as I can tell, this TruhealthMD business looks to be very small. And you're telling me doctors have no financial incentives from the drug companies in prescribing their products? Let's not be naïve here. Also, the writer doesn't say anything about selling these products directly to her patients, just creating the products because of her patients' experiences.

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