70,000 private Minnesota wells are in line for nitrate testing

  • Article by: Josephine Marcotty , Star Tribune
  • Updated: November 15, 2013 - 9:35 AM

State officials seek to measure and fix fertilizer contamination.

  • 19
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
nortcydNov. 14, 13 9:33 PM

Alternative is we can starve. Can we PLEASE stop interfering with our Domestic issues from within. Farmers are some of the very few land stewards we have left. Continued interference in Domestic growth because of isolated fools within our society is crippling us.

2
43
Geezer1976Nov. 14, 13 9:42 PM

How about wells in the urban areas being tested too. Think about all of the fertilizer and chemicals being dumped on lawns by homeowners. The rates applied on a per acre basis is often several times that of agricultural applications. And then, take a look at the runoff from lawns. Once it leaves the lawn and goes into the storm sewer system, it is a straight shot into a lake or river in full concentration.

26
1
garcialaterNov. 14, 1310:04 PM

" That could mean asking farmers not to fertilize in the fall, when the risk to water is greatest" Interesting. In the last week or two I have seen several farmers dragging ammonia tanks across their recently plowed fields. Stewards of the land.. 45 percent of our corn crop is converted to ethanol. Not the wisest approach.

30
3
birdchayserNov. 15, 1312:44 AM

Please, don't leave the health and we'll being of these people in the hands of farmers. Stewards of the land is complete garbage. Every year I go to North Dakota and see for myself the immense damage these so-called stewards inflict on every acre they can...including wetlands. The only part these farmers should play in solving this is to give up their subsidies and pay out of pocket to clean up the water supply THEY polluted. So sick of this bogus love affair with farmers...they take, we give.

24
6
huntstealthyNov. 15, 13 5:35 AM

"Farmers are some of the very few land stewards we have left." Holy cow...this character has no idea what stewardship of the land really means. The great big pink elephant in the room, nay the state, is that this land is more or less raped! ...and for the betterment of the almighty $ in the farmers pocket, at the expense of the taxpayer. People can "volunteer" not to litter - but now don't you have a law against littering accompanied with a stiff fine. Good luck with that "volunteering" to not use nitrogen.

14
1
optionNov. 15, 13 5:48 AM

It doesn't sound like anyone knows what they're doing!

8
1
acctsah2Nov. 15, 13 6:27 AM

"Alternative is we can starve." - - - Seriously? So you would rather become seriously ill? I guess consuming pesticides is not so bad right?

8
2
t_stevensNov. 15, 13 6:49 AM

This concern is roughly 40-50 years too late. The poisons in our groundwater and aquifers from BAD farming practices is killing us all. Now GMOs will make it even worse. Since the advent of Roundup resistant GMOs, farmers have been slopping exponentially more herbicide on their fields. This produces RESISTANT super weeds, which in turn causes the farmers to throw even more of the poison on the problem. Like our fiat currency system, modern farming practices are unsustainable.

5
5
Doggone1Nov. 15, 13 7:16 AM

For those posting about ammonia tanks being drug across fields a note of some facts for you. anhydrous ammonia is the least leachable of nitrogen fertilizers because it is not in a nitrate form. When applied to fields when the soil tempature are below 50 degrees the bacteria that convert ammonia to nitrate are not active. So applying anhydrous ammonia to the soil in the fall when soil tempature are below 50f is a responsible practice. It seems like farmer bashing is the new pastime fad in posting comments. Farmers must follow guidelines in the application of fertilizers, manure and chemicals. And to those that think fertilizers should be taxed to the farmers it already is.

8
5
jeffhcarterNov. 15, 13 8:43 AM

the trouble with voluntary restraint in fertilizing is that the responsible farmers may follow restrictions, but the irresponsible ones won't. The only way to get every farmer to follow is to have laws restricting fertilizer and pesticide use. It seems the state's plan is to wait until the groundwater is so polluted it will poison us all (or cost millions to filter) and THEN try to control the pollution. Kind of like their failed plan to keep out alien plants and water animals. I don't get the idea of "its ok to pollute the groundwater" and then make the taxpayer pay to fix it. Doesn't make sense for those that polluted it to pay for filtering or fixing it?

9
0

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: Can the Wild rally to win its playoff series against Colorado?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT