Fewer students seek advanced degrees at U of M

  • Article by: Jenna Ross , Star Tribune
  • Updated: November 12, 2013 - 9:56 PM

Complicated funding pressures might be influencing a dip in enrollment.

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homeryanstaNov. 13, 1312:02 AM

not worth the money if you'll be at the same wage as your bachelors friend.

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plizzoNov. 13, 13 1:43 AM

Or maybe the job market is so bad that an advanced degree is no longer worth the cost? Law school applications dipped when the economy dipped.

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physics1966Nov. 13, 13 3:08 AM

Exactly why is it that we see ads in the media selling MBA at Carlson School of Business, but no ads selling the Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at U of M's Institute of Technology?

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keaton12Nov. 13, 13 6:13 AM

Many companies pay for advanced degree tuition but they don't give you a bump in pay when it is completed. If you want an advanced degree, it is purely a personal goal. Don't expect it to payoff in your wallet in the workplace. The teaching profession will pay you more but generally industry does not pay you more. My boss gave me a nice cake when I got my MBA but that was it. I make less after my MBA than before my MBA.

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panktainterNov. 13, 13 6:24 AM

Real simple answer, it costs too much.

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elmore1Nov. 13, 13 6:47 AM

Until the U reduces their bloated expense structure and better align programs with employment opportunities this will continue. I don't see a big demand in the business community for MBA's or Masters of any kind. Even if you have one you aren't paid a lot more, your career advancement is based on your results not your academic credentials.

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hazzzeeNov. 13, 13 6:53 AM

The cost is not the issue, education is THE best investment you'll ever make, PERIOD. The problem lies in the desire, or lack thereof.

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lakeelmo99Nov. 13, 13 7:00 AM

After receiving an MBA at the Carlson School, I was hired into a corporate group at 3M. The corporate 3M wants more MBAs to work with the engineers to evaluate ideas but the engineer led divisions don't want you messing with their business. I'd recommend going with an engineering undergrad and skip the MBA.

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dentesterNov. 13, 13 7:11 AM

Getting your MBA or PhD may increase your knowledge, but that's only transferable in academia. In the real world, people aren't paid for what they know, they're paid for what they can do. Having an advanced degree in a job that requires you to perform company or industry-specific procedures is meaningless.

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Exegesis4meNov. 13, 13 7:11 AM

If the issue is one that can be reduced to a cost/benefit analysis, then you don't belong in graduate school in the first place.

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