Second choices may alter Minneapolis mayoral race

  • Article by: Eric Roper , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 28, 2013 - 7:50 AM

California cities show how ranked-choice voting can rearrange outcomes.

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plizzoOct. 27, 1311:53 PM

"Second choices may alter Minneapolis mayoral race" Really? Tell us something we didn't already know. With ranked choice voting, you basically get a throw-away vote because if you think your number one choice has no chance of winning, your vote for that person really won't matter. So why not throw away your first vote for some guy who dresses up like a pirate? This is what the liberal left and Democratic Party in Minneapolis wanted. So if you end up making a mockery of your election process, you Minneapolis residents have nobody to blame but yourselves. You would not have the assortment of characters running for Mayor or the sheer number (over 30!) without ranked choice voting that you Minneapolis residents wanted. Arrrg!

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michaelpatrickOct. 28, 13 1:52 AM

Thanks Strib for clarifying that of the two California cities that have used IRV that the Oakland referred to is Oakland, Calif.

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tullymnOct. 28, 13 6:34 AM

This is a joke. Everyone I know has their first candidate identified and is putting a long shot like Cam or the pirate as their other choices. Expecting the average person to research and rank their candidates is unrealistic. I hope a long shot wins so we can get rid of this joke.

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stpaulisbestOct. 28, 13 7:28 AM

Of course, in a real run off, the voter would know who is still in the race. With Ranked Choice (Instant Runoff) the voter isn't allowed the privilege of that knowledge. What if the voter would prefer a different candidate based upon knowing who is still in the race? Well, too bad voter.

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randomthghtOct. 28, 13 8:38 AM

Ranked choice isn't the problem with this race. It's the fact that anyone with a twenty dollar bill could get their name on the ballot. How about demanding that future candidates get at least 500 names on a petition before they can be placed on the ballot?

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Cory089Oct. 28, 13 8:41 AM

Tullymn - I wouldn't call Cam a long shot by any means. The polling I saw shows him right near the top. He's also pulling together a broad coalition from across the political spectrum. Add that to last-second deciders who see his private-sector success with an alternative-energy company, and he's got a very real shot at winning.

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twincitizen1Oct. 28, 1311:49 AM

Prediction: Mark Andrew gets the most first-choice votes, loses. Good. Either Betsy Hodges or (dark horse) Cam Winton will take the lead based on the broader base of voters they appeal to than Mark Andrew's narrow band of union members/party establishment/old-school DFLers. People will complain, but no one, not even Mark Andrew's most ardent supporters will be calling for a repeal of Ranked Choice Voting...it is very popular, and for good reason. We need ranked choice voting statewide to continue to show the rest of the country how Minnesota gets it done with the highest voter turnout in the nation year after year.

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davidcaryOct. 28, 1312:38 PM

Strib readers should be informed that David Latterman was a campaign consultant for Don Perata's losing 2010 effort to be Oakland Mayor. Knowing that puts his comments in a different light, especially since weeks before that election there was a published poll that showed the race was at least very close, after accounting for second and third choices. If Latterman was unaware of this, it helps explain why Quan passed Perata in the final weeks of the campaign. Quan won because she out-campaigned Perata with a personally energetic, grassroots campaign. She won even though she was out-spent by Perata supporters by about 4-to-1, with much of the Perata money coming from special interests outside of Oakland. Perata wasn't just a former state senator, he was a former state senate president, one of the most powerful politicians in the state. Partly because of Perata's reliance on out-of-town donors and partly because of his apparent ill-health during the campaign, Quan likely would have won with or without RCV. In the aftermath, Perata and Latterman are still trying shift the blame for their failed campaign that left a lot of big money donors greatly disappointed.

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mudlockOct. 29, 1312:23 PM

I see lots of similarities to Oakland. And I predict, like Quan, the eventually winner in Minneapolis will not have a majority of the votes cast. (Quan won with 45%.) Furthermore, I predict that there will be at least a 3% ballot-spoilage rate. (More than twice as high as the pre-RCV rate.)

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owatonnabillNov. 5, 1312:13 PM

Heh. The Minneapolis mayoral election. Like watching the circus, but cheaper. You can take this to the bank: if anything happens to upset the far-left applecart in this election those doing the loudest yowling will be those most strongly in favor of the system before the election. Be careful what you wish for. You might get it.

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