On the Hill, during shutdown, essential is in the eye of the officeholder

  • Article by: COREY MITCHELL , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 12, 2013 - 10:44 PM

Washington – In Minnesota, the government shutdown has left national parks closed, government agencies understaffed and residents worried about the fate of their federal benefits.

  • 5
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 5 of 5
rjr2205Oct. 12, 13 5:18 PM

Michele Bachman must need her staff to work on the "light bulb" issue!!

5
2
basia2186Oct. 12, 13 5:44 PM

Stop paying congress for pretending to be essential. No pay till we have a balanced budget with no tax increase.

6
2
jhb8426Oct. 12, 13 8:36 PM

I think that ANY position that was furloughed can be declared non-essential and eliminated from the budget totally. Think of the savings.

4
2
CSMahonOct. 13, 1311:02 AM

My son has been doing an unpaid "internship" in one of our national elected official's Washington D.C. offices. I put in quotes internship because it has been anything but; he has been doing virtually anything but an educational focused learning experience. This elected official's staff has had him opening mail, checking e-mail and answering constituent calls. What does this have to do with the article? When the government shutdown began, my son's supervisor sent a message to all of the interns that said, "interns are expected to come into the office in the event of a shutdown. With the majority of the Administrative staff classified as “non-excepted” (i.e. those who cannot work during a shutdown), this means you all are going to be our front lines in regards to running the office. You all will be managing the front office and phones yourselves…" I'm curious why none of these national elected officials failed in your article to say anything about the unpaid interns who were directed to cover for their paid staff.

2
0
firefight41Oct. 13, 13 4:18 PM

Why don't the states take over the everyday business of the nation parks, after all, the states are the ones that make out on the visitors that go to those parks, that way the federal government can stop funding those parks and the states can pay for them with the money they make.

0
2
  • 1 - 5 of 5

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT