Deformed wolf that bit Minnesota teen had brain damage

  • Article by: Mary Lynn Smith , Star Tribune
  • Updated: September 27, 2013 - 12:38 AM

Tests results show that a wolf that bit a 16-year-old boy’s head at a northern Minnesota campground had severe deformities as well as brain damage, which likely explains the reason for the “unprecedented” freak attack, wildlife specialists said Thursday.

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davehougSep. 26, 1310:13 PM

RARE, but wolf-human attacks will be more common because some wanted to bring back a predator. Taking your pet or child for a walk is now dangerous......Thanks to wolves being brought to a high population.

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EleanoreSep. 27, 13 7:17 AM

" but wolf-human attacks will be more common because some wanted to bring back a predator." - 4500 is not a high population. 6000 is not a high population. How much money are select individuals making from this wolf hunt? That's the bottom line here, follow the money, and you'll see who's "science" is being supported by the DNR and the party. This hunt needs to be stopped until Minnesotans wolf population is back upto snuff with the numbers above.

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segavinSep. 27, 13 8:57 AM

Bottom line is this: we kill the wolves and have a deer problem. Traditional Minnesotans have 4 children each and then complain that one wolf every 50 square miles is too many. Remember where you came from. Bring back the wolf!

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tfnlicSep. 27, 13 9:19 AM

Of course there's a Stark explaining for a wolf.

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EleanoreSep. 27, 13 9:24 AM

"Bottom line is this: we kill the wolves and have a deer problem." - false as false can be. Also, test studies have shown when the DNR oversells deer licenses deer numbers plummet within a permit zone. I think the DNR has more than a handle on keeping the deer population whatever the politicians tell them to keep it at.

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fishing341Sep. 27, 13 9:30 AM

When we went to Duluth this past Spring, there were hundreds of deer lining the roadsides eating the new grass coming up. It was such a late Spring that they were desperate for the food and were risking eating right out in the open, along side traffic, in broad day light. I couldn't believe the numbers of these deer! You couldn't toss a rock without hitting one! The poor things were terribly thin and boney. You can't take the wolves out of the picture and not expect to have more consequences to deal with.

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threed61Sep. 27, 1310:45 AM

Fishing341, the wolves don't go after deer, they go after fat, slow, livestock and tame house pets. And apparently the occasional sleeping teen.

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greatxSep. 27, 13 8:03 PM

segavin says: "Bottom line is this: we kill the wolves and have a deer problem."

Both species would be eradicated if I had my way. On a ten mile stretch of state highway going past my home, there was a dead deer every mile last winter.

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greatxSep. 27, 13 8:06 PM

Eleanore says: ""Bottom line is this: we kill the wolves and have a deer problem." - false as false can be. Also, test studies have shown when the DNR oversells deer licenses deer numbers plummet within a permit zone. I think the DNR has more than a handle on keeping the deer population whatever the politicians tell them to keep it at."

No the DNR doesn't. Ask a local farmer in MN to show you the damage deer do to a corn field. Racoons too for that matter, and they are all over the road too...

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gunumdownSep. 27, 13 8:48 PM

Shoot all the wolves and be done with it. Worthless vermin.

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