Asian carp must be stopped

  • Article by: TOM LANDWEHR
  • Updated: September 25, 2013 - 4:46 PM

Let’s stick to facts — all the facts — and close the lock before it’s too late.

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arspartzSep. 24, 13 7:25 PM

At what cost? Is it worth shutting down commerce and shipping on the rivers to preserve your preferred quality of life? MN cannot survive on tourism alone.

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spicebearSep. 24, 13 8:17 PM

The realty is that species like Asian Carp can't be "stopped." They will spread one way or the other. The can only be adapted to.

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aarghmebuckoSep. 24, 1310:03 PM

The tourism industry dependent on a healthy fishery dwarves the limited number of businesses that use the st Anthony locks. Better safe than sorry.

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burkegenzSep. 24, 1310:58 PM

The DNR has consistently failed to address the Asian Carps problem. The legislature gave them $500,000 in 2008 to get working on the threat-money never spent. The legislature gave them $16.7 million in 2011 to utilize Coon Rapids Dam as a 99.9% effective barrier(their study states that effectiveness)-nothing started until this year and won't finish until next year. Started a study on identifying most threatened waterways in State-started this Spring and no word has been heard. Wasted $1 million on a deterrent barrier study, at Lock 1, that regurgitated outdated studies. Have not assisted in the project to rebuild the Anoka Dam as an deterrent barrier for the Rum River and Mille Lacs Lake As for the impact on the Miss. R. to St. Cloud and Mille Lacs, if all boating and fishing were to cease in these areas, it is a $29 million impact(once again, from a DNR study). As for the Crow and Sauk, until their waters are cleaned up, the Asian Carps will have nowhere near the impact they will have on productive streams downriver-the DNR has stated that there is nothing they can do to help trout streams in SE MN. This is really about Mpls. getting more Riverfront land for developers and the All-Powerful Mpls. Park Board.

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msimsiSep. 24, 1311:30 PM

Sometimes I wonder if this can be stopped. One malicious person or several stupid people could, within a few days spread Asian carp to most of northern Minnesota and Wisconsin, plus the Great Lakes. I'm a little surprised that someone who would be economically hurt by the shutting of locks on the Mississippi (or the Chicago River passage to Lake Michigan) hasn't just transported the carp themselves. The crime would be almost impossible to solve and the losses would be enormous. Going up north won't be much fun once boating becomes hazardous and fishing bad and there are 900 million trees dead from emerald ash borers and waiting to burn.

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rshacklefordSep. 25, 13 3:44 AM

Why is Tom (DNR) piping up now about how these fish are pretty much unstoppable when his own staff have been saying the same thing for over a year? Tom needs to realize that a biological, not physical, solution needs to be found. Something like a chemical that makes them sterile or a poison that just outright kills them. Anything short of that is just a waste of money. Then again, perhaps this is exactly how our ecosystem was supposed to evolve and we just don't know it.

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owatonnabillSep. 25, 13 6:39 AM

Owatonnabill read awhile back that extreme environmentalists don't love the environment, they hate America, and extreme environmentalism is merely their weapon. Anything to impede progress and hinder economic development. Permanently close a lock on a major waterway and thus hamstring a lot of the commerce that would take place above it, just to impede the spread of a fish that most certainly will find other ways? Sure. Why not? But this is precisely the same mentality that blocked the development of a major dam in Tennessee in 1973 because of a nondescript fish, and more recently impeding forest product development in the Pacific Northwest because of a bird. And one scarcely need mention the interminable (almost uncountable) times that "environmental studies" have been used to indefinitely delay, and oftentimes totally block, economic development in Minnesota and in other states. Anybody here recall the last time a major oil refinery was built in America? For the majority of the readers here probably not yet born at the time, in was in 1977 in Garyville, Indiana. And how many of our staunch defenders of the environment even know where ANWR is? Same story, different day, folks. We've LOST this battle. The Asian Carp has won. Time to start adapting and utilizing, rather than bemoaning. And all the useless hand-wringing and public caterwauling on the part of The-Sky-Is-Falling crowd won't do a whit to change that reality.

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supervon2Sep. 25, 13 6:46 AM

Carp are not native. Pheasants are not native. Dandelions are not native. Corn is not native. The list is endless. Somehow we survive. The Asian carp will not bring the world to an end but don't kill industry and jobs for something that is inevitable.

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msimsiSep. 25, 13 7:39 AM

Wow - do people really think the job loss from a couple of industrial businesses is anywhere close to the potential job loss from fishing and tourism in northern Minnesota? This is not like the spotted owl controversy. The big economic losses are due to the environmental problem. If closing this lock would work, it would be a no-brainer to do it. The problem is showing that closing the lock would work.

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stpaulisbestSep. 25, 13 7:49 AM

IF the carp could be stopped rather than delayed, I would agree wholeheartedly. But, given that they can't be stopped (and they can't) it makes no sense to spend millions in taxpayer money to destroy businesses in a misguided effort to do something that can't be done.

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