Minneapolis schools shift to growth mode

  • Article by: Steve Brandt , Star Tribune
  • Updated: September 25, 2013 - 11:50 AM

As enrollment rises, the district plans to reopen and expand schools, shuffle programs and add an arts high school. Discussion will follow.

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ol2096Sep. 24, 13 7:58 PM

"One major proposal would shift incoming students enrolling from the downtown core from a path toward southwest schools toward northeast choices and eventually Edison High School." -- Well, as a downtown resident, this confirms that we'll be leaving before our kids reach school age. I suspect the same is true for our peers as well.

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reader22Sep. 24, 13 8:28 PM

Here's a thought - what about first putting some air conditioning in the buildings that have none?!?! What difference is this plan going to make if kids are literally baking in their school buildings?

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movebak2mplsSep. 24, 13 9:54 PM

I hope they are considering more K-12 options downtown. With all the growth in the core, it would be silly to not build where the growth is. People that raise their children downtown should be able to send their kids to (great) schools downtown.

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furguson11Sep. 24, 1310:20 PM

Hopefully the four year graduation rate rises above 50%, or all we'll be doing is running more kids through a failing school district.

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cav1234Sep. 24, 1310:57 PM

Although the District should plan for enrollment changes, the constant lurching from one plan to another year in and year out, shifting kids and changing emphases (now they are going to move back toward magnet high school offerings?!?) reinforces one of the things I dislike most about the District - a persistent feeling of instability and unpredictability. And adding space to schools like SW and Washburn and South make huge sense - but mainly to reduce ridiculous class sizes, not to immediately add even more kids, unless they are building space for twice as many kids as they are adding.

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comment229Sep. 25, 13 5:22 AM

Some of you don't get it. Schools provide the education but cannot force it on students. They have to "want to." It is like your car's gas tank. The gas stations are there, but you have to take the time to be vigilant enough to fill your gas tank. Students who show up just to show up are the problem. Students who don't show up, have given up for whatever the reason may be. I will guarantee you that you will NOT find those reasons in this article or any other I have read in this paper in the last few years. I've said it before. Get Johnson and the school board and a bunch of "know it all" business men and politicians in a room with 15 drop outs, and 15 kids who want to drop out but are not 16, and listen to why they hate school. Further, make sure the media is there to report on all this! You will not like what you hear and will find out what our society has become. Go ahead, blame a teacher. They are used to it by now; frustrated by it, but used to it.

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circleoflifeSep. 25, 13 6:27 AM

Somehow people always forget that yes, there are more coming in but there are also those that leave whether it's graduation, moving district schools or moving out of the city. People always make it sound like no one ever leaves, only add. For the minimal time students are actually in school in this state, air conditioning is a waste of money. Class sizes to big? Old and irrelevant argument for more money. Class sizes have been pretty much the same for years and are not a factor in learning. Kids behaving and applying themselves are the problem. Quality teachers, money being applied where it was intended and accountability on the parents are what is needed for our schools to be successful.

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darkcircleSep. 25, 13 8:23 AM

There are educational strategies that old timers have for improving education that will advance contemporary changes in education and there’s an educational strategy that new generations have that can also advance education. The challenge is to decipher which ones are good and which ones are bad. Repetition, personal responsibility and endurance are old traditions that need reimplementation into current curriculum. Innovation, creativity and the arts are new tools that can skyrocket education. My high school centered in the arts and we had the highest quota of SAT finalist and that's not a coincidence. The older generation doesn't understand the value of arts because they don't see the correlation. If you walk into a district school or a charter school, you'll notice that the musicians and the artists hold the academic edge over the straight edge pencil holders. I would consider funding art curriculum more than any other trade and not let the post civil war pigs try to divert the atmosphere in our schools any longer.

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