Minnesota's Hazelden, California's Betty Ford Center to merge

  • Article by: Jackie Crosby , Star Tribune
  • Updated: September 24, 2013 - 11:03 PM

New entity will be the nation’s largest nonprofit addiction treatment center.

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mnpls123Sep. 24, 13 5:38 PM

Is the motivation for the two "non-profits" to merge about better care or about enhancing the size of the executive's pay checks?

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gemie1Sep. 24, 13 5:56 PM

The Minnesota model and the twelve step program seems to have a success rate for about 30 percent of the patients. Will their be other strategies or treatment plans that take this into account? What about a comprehensive program for dual diagnosis? A real family program that has therapists trained in family therapy?

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notsidSep. 24, 13 6:30 PM

The pressure to merge is no doubt due to the coverage for chemical dependency treatment by the health plans, most of whom have a default position or preference of out patient rather than in patient or residential care. Research has shown that the outcomes between outpatient and inpatient treatment programs in terms of recidivism and so on are very similar for the most part, hence, the lack of demand for in-patient beds as those at Hazelden and Betty Ford. In addition, the private pay market that they also service may be drying up a bit as well due to other competitors on the same market who may offer the same services at a lower price and/or perhaps, for less than the old 28-day stay which always a function of reimbursement rather than therapeutic care frames...always!

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csjohn1Sep. 24, 13 7:23 PM

My dad went through Hazelden twice. Crashed both times. Ultimately the issue is understanding that your life is out of control and a preparedness to make the difficult changes. He found that in an AA Meeting program. My sense was that most of the participants understood that it was a no BS session. He never completed the full 12 steps, but he found the necessary support to quit. The point is that each person finds their own way. No magic cure. No one cares for you if you don't care for yourself.

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fwallenSep. 24, 13 7:28 PM

Executives a both facilities are paid below standards in similar for profit and not for profit entities, although thre are no truly comparable organizations. Both are superior performers. Outcomes are difficult to measure especially in the out years, but if I had family that needed this type of care I'd send them to Hazelden.

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slpmommySep. 24, 13 8:11 PM

The Minnesota model and the twelve step program seems to have a success rate for about 30 percent of the patients. Will their be other strategies or treatment plans that take this into account? My understanding is both have much lower success rates. Here's hoping they utilize other models, including medications, etc, go with what works rather than the 12 step hegemony.

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dbtorgersonSep. 25, 13 7:35 AM

Twelve step methodology is but one theoretical approach employed by Hazelden and happens to be evidence based in its efficacy. Hazelden practices originated a multidisciplinary approach and has been a leader in implementing evidence based strategies to include pharmacological interventions toward efforts to stem the epidemic of opioid/heroin dependence. Hazelden employs some of the most talented professionals in the CD and mental health field worldwide.

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truthingtonSep. 25, 13 7:49 AM

Both Hazelden and Betty Ford have 'published' very limited results of success for their treatments yet continue to charge folks over $30K a month for treatment. Outpatient medication treatments, such as naltrexone, acamprosate, disulfiram (and now nalmefene in the EU) have been PROVEN effective in combating the urges to engage in drinking and/or illicit drug use yet are often banned in such facilities (see comments from the CEO of Betty Ford). It's criminal that these so-called 'non-profits' continue to 'treat' people without publishing - in peer-reviewed journals - their short and long term success rates. Why should anyone pay for 'treatment' with extremely limited, quantifiable results?! For those who say it's hard to measure, you're right, it is hard to measure. However, we have relapse rates for other indicated-treatments for alcohol dependence and drug dependence so why doesn't Hazelden/Betty Ford publish their results? Traditional methodology suggests that if you can't get ahold of a patient post-tx that you should consider them as relapsing. Drug and therapy studies conform to these rules and publish their results. Why not the almighty Hazelden/Betty Ford clinics?

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truthingtonSep. 25, 13 7:53 AM

@dbtorgerson They only employ former or recovering 'addicts' because they are the only ones who 'understand' the nature of addiction. With this philosophy, should an individual with a cardiac condition only see a doctor who's had a heart attack? If they are depressed, should they only see a therapist if that therapist has had depression? You get my point. While Hazelden is far more modernized than Betty Ford, I would still argue that their entire philosophy of care is antiquated at best.

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th3171Sep. 25, 1310:26 AM

"They only employ former or recovering 'addicts' because they are the only ones who 'understand' the nature of addiction." I'm not sure where you picked up this information but it is not necessarily true. One doesn't need to have a history of addiction to become a CD counselor. CD treatment facilities generally ask that those counselors with an addiction history have it managed for a period of time.

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