Former Minnesota Gov. Al Quie is out front on education

  • Article by: LORI STURDEVANT , Star Tribune
  • Updated: September 21, 2013 - 5:37 PM

That includes a mayoral endorsement and ideas others might find hard to pitch.

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JesusrulesSep. 21, 13 5:04 PM

Thanks Ms. Sturdevant for this piece. It cements my respect for Mr. Quie and Mr. Samuels.

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farcicalSep. 21, 13 7:54 PM

Forcing teachers to live with their students, or vice-versa is about as archaic as the man himself. Teachers are teachers...society really should not be expecting them to be parents 24/7 as well. I assume Fortune 500 CEOs will also be residing with their poorest-performing employees as well, right? Furthermore, while I applaud his idea of allowing employees to lunch or snack with their children, reverting to the "company store" model is yet another step back in time. Does the parent get fired if/when the student needs special education services requiring 1:1 help? I thank you for your service, Governor, but your time has passed.

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jdlellis1Sep. 22, 13 6:28 AM

The success of any municipality relies on three foundational factors; 1-Safety/Security: Citizens must feel safe. 2-Education: Families are looking for an educational that delivers a quality education (reading, writing, arithmetic). 3-Business Climate: Municipalities must have a profitable business climate which can contribute to funding the core "musts" not "wants" of the city. Minneapolis and to a lesser degree St. Paul, is failing on safety and education and has a history of a complex business climate that has many businesses (large, medium and small) looking to other locations.

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Willy53Sep. 22, 13 6:39 AM

Huh? Teachers moving in with their most challenged students? Rediculous. Teachers should not be foreced to move out of their homes with their children to other neighborhoods. The impracticality of this idea is staggering. Would the home be big enough? I could go on. Education should be local. The old way was to have many smaller schools more neighborhood oriented and this approach worked pretty well. It was only when the dense concentration of poverty challenged the finances of those schools that consolidation, bussing, open enrollment and other approaches to mix students began to surface. Part of his theory about localizing is workable. Educating the family with respect to preparing children for learning is widely recognized as having expanded benefits. Bt part of it is bizarre.

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farcicalSep. 22, 1311:01 AM

jdlellis1 - your statements have absolutely ZERO truth based on facts and are entirely based on personal opinion. Mpls crime rates (violent, juvenile, and even petty) have decreased - both reported and prosecuted. Business climate is FANTASTIC. Look at employment rates for large cities and regional areas. Mpls and the Twin Cities are at or near the top. Education is lagging in terms of graduation rates and the gap...but overall and subgroup comparisons of student test scores (NAEP) show Mpls to also be near the top, again when compared to large cities. The problem is the concentration of poverty, specifically along racial lines, within certain neighborhoods. Graduation rates suffer due to the mobility of the high-poverty families. A kid who leaves Mpls Pub Schools before graduating is often cited as "not graduated" and students often arrive from other districts behind in credits, and also get marked as "not graduated" when they move on. Without Mpls as a central hub, there are no suburbs in which flamethrowers like you and others can live and work. MANY suburbanites cherish and respect the city itself, so it is acceptable to do so. Do some research - even simple searches here on the StarTribune. The stories are there.

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keithreitmanSep. 22, 1311:34 AM

Al Quie considers Don Samuels "sincere". But Don Samuels' 'sincerity' and brand of flawed leadership has not brought any benefits nor success to his council ward, his neighborhood, nor even the block that he has lived on for over 15 years. He was sincere when he shouted, "Burn Down North High." "I Mean Burn it Down!" He was sincere, again, when he jumped out of his car recently to accost and chastise two young black men in the twilight of a summer evening recently as one of them was urinating in public on West Broadway. But then he needed the Minneapolis Police to settle things because he was "sincere" but not wise. Most importantly toward his failure as a civic leader, he is "sincere" in his hatred for landlords, a class of businessmen he often calls "slumlords". But he never has attempted any outreach to them. No communication with them other than dirty name calling from him. His "sincerity" kept him form having even a modest dialogue with the hated "slumlords" to solve problems for the greater good of his Council Ward, his community, or even his block. He missed all opportunities, during his LONG tenure as our Council Member to engage in any constructive dialogue and problem solving with landlords. Yes, he "sincerely" hated them but the outcome is his ward suffered from his missed opportunities to bring additional stake holders to the table. That is the Failure of his "Sincerity". This failed politician, Don Samuels, should not be our next mayor. No No.

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jayman1816Sep. 22, 13 9:50 PM

Quie is a RINO. The only solution to the flawed government run education is vouchers.

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