For better Minneapolis schools, embrace mayoral control

  • Article by: FRANCIS X. SHEN
  • Updated: September 19, 2013 - 6:51 PM

Evidence suggests that it helps. Minneapolis candidates, what say you?

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farcicalSep. 18, 13 8:41 PM

The Mpls mayor isn't given much (if any) power over the city as it stands. We have a superintendent and a Board of Education. No need for a mayor to appoint unelected people and take control of something over which there is already stewardship. The districts mentioned as thriving under mayoral control are disintegrating under corporate-sponsored reform that undermines the education career. A mayor is forever beholden to special interests (from ALL points on the political spectrum). Giving those same (external) interests more power in directing schools or the district will lead to degradation and more segregation. Jefferson and Twain promoted inclusive, specifically public, educational programs as the backbone of a thriving democracy. Removing that choice from voters and placing it in the hands of a mayor elected on more visible issues (nevermind the potential chaos of ranked choice voting) is a step backward, not forward.

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tandabussSep. 18, 13 9:29 PM

Yeah, cuz teachers' unions are so much better at running the school system. Not.

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supervon2Sep. 18, 13 9:44 PM

Then we can have a successful school and a safe city like Chicago.

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swmnguySep. 18, 1310:09 PM

Maybe a mayor who is responsible for the schools will admit the problems stem from poverty and are not the teachers' fault. Maybe a mayor on the hook for actual performance will chase out the corporate-backed charlatans who promise easy solutions but skip town before the long-term results are shown to be false promises. But I bet not. I don't see any politicians anywhere willing to tell the truth about long-term structural issues, when they can play Music Man until the end of their next term.

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badcopperSep. 19, 13 6:09 AM

Education will not improve unless parenting improves

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jackpine091Sep. 19, 13 7:53 AM

Getting more politicians involved in "education reform" is always a good idea.....how silly.

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ummmyeahSep. 19, 13 8:11 AM

Sorry parents, but a Mayor can't make your kids do better in school. That's up to you and your child.

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elind56Sep. 19, 13 8:43 AM

For decades now we've been barraged with endless speeches calling for all manner of spending increases, classroom size reductions, spending increases, salary increases for teachers (regardless of their suitability for the task), spending increases, and more efficient spending of the spending increases. All we ever get is an ever more bloated bureacracy staffed with more and more vice-principals and assistants to the assistants. When, pray-tell, will the people say enough is enough?

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raleighmamaSep. 19, 13 9:51 AM

Most of our Minneapolis Mayors can't get the city to run properly, why would we want them running the schools? There is a reason we have a separate elected school board, let's keep it that way.

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buzzard23Sep. 19, 1310:01 AM

I will state the same as I did in the comments for Ms. nordgren's editorial: Ok Mayor, you win. How much money do you need? If just one superintendent, or one union leader, or one Mayor, had the guts to step forward, to step up, and say, " to get the results you citizens want, 90% reading at level by third grade, close achievement gap and 80% grad rate I will need $x dollars. Provide that and we can be successful." Problem is, there is NOT one, or any, superintendent, mayor or union leader that can provide that information. They just do not know, so they just ask for more.

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