Data suggests Mount McKinley, North America's tallest peak, may actually be 83 feet shorter

  • Article by: BECKY BOHRER , Associated Press
  • Updated: September 13, 2013 - 8:36 AM

JUNEAU, Alaska — North America's tallest peak, Alaska's Mount McKinley, may have been taken down a notch.

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bigjimmy007Sep. 13, 13 9:49 AM

It's still pretty darn tall.

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mahogma66Sep. 13, 1310:24 AM

From base to summit, the most massive mountain in the world. The peak of Everest is 12,000 ft above the base; Denali is 18,000.

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trudgeSep. 13, 1310:44 AM

That will make getting to the top a lot easier!

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mike06597Sep. 13, 1311:08 AM

Really?? Come on- 83 feet on 20,000+ feet is a rounding error.

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rschildkSep. 13, 13 2:04 PM

Actually, the tallest mountain in the world measured from it's base is Mauna Kea in Hawaii. When measured from its oceanic base, its height is 33,100 ft.

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braxozSep. 13, 13 2:56 PM

From the Mountain Professor dot com: "So let's get this straight: What is the tallest mountain in the world? OK, when measured from sea level Mount Everest(29,035 ft; 8,849 m.) is the tallest and extends farthest into the atmosphere than any other peak in the world. However, the mountain peak that is closest to the moon and stars, is Mount Chimborazo (20,565 ft; 6,268 m.) in Ecuador. This is because the earth, its atmosphere and oceans bulge 26.5 miles at the equator, and Chimborazo sits higher up on the bulge than Everest, making it about 1.5 miles closer to the moon. Or another way to look at it is that Chimborazo is the farthest point from the earth's center, at 3,967.1 miles, while Everest is only 3,965.8 miles. OK, with all of that out of the way, where was I? Oh, yeah, so the highest "free-standing" mountain in the world is Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa, at 19,341 (5,895 m.) feet above sea level (ASL). "Free-standing" means it stands alone and is not part of a mountain range. Usually these are volcanic mountains. The tallest mountain when measured from its base is Mauna Kea in Hawaii, at over 33,000 feet (10,058 m.)-- however its base is many miles below the ocean surface, and only 13,796 feet (4,205 m.) of that is above sea level! The mountain with the highest base-to-summit vertical rise above sea level (just over 18,000 feet, or 5,486 meters), is Mount McKinley (Denali) in Alaska (20,320 ft; 6,193 m.)

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