Minnesota legislators OK disaster relief; tax talks delayed

  • Article by: By Jim Ragsdale and Rachel E. Stassen-Berger , Star Tribune staff writers
  • Updated: September 10, 2013 - 6:52 AM

Lawmakers’ differences on taxes will be pushed into next year’s session.

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dakmarknetSep. 10, 13 6:27 AM

When asked to show a source of revenue, either with cuts or additional revenue, republican leaders could not present any alternatives to off set the 300 million needed to balance the budget. This is typical. They are incapable of leadership. I am greatful to the dfl leaders and if the budget forecasts come in higher than expected, they will reconsider the taxes they proposed earlier. This is responsible leadersjip. Bravo.

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EleanoreSep. 10, 13 7:19 AM

One of the most partisan (both sides corporatist), predatory, and disrespectful sessions of our legislature in the history of the state. This irresponsible leadership should be facing criminal charges for acts against the state. It's clear the people are not represented in our houses of governance anymore, these have been occupied by domestic organization who take our resources for their own purposes. there are laws against that, both civil and god given. I wouldn't want to associate with these individuals, it just isn't safe.

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avejoeconSep. 10, 13 7:59 AM

dakmarknet--------Funny that you didn't mention that there were no offsets with the Tax increase that the DFL wanted to get rid off.

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checkfactsSep. 10, 13 8:46 AM

The Governor negotiated a contract with the leadership of both parties in both houses of the legislature well before the special session began. Legislators who introduced bills for tax repeals were simply performing publicity stunts for people naive enough to believe they are serious. The agreement their leadership signed made these stunt-bills DOA and useable only for campaign press releases. Introducing a bill initiates a cost to the state far higher than the special session per diem a legislator may or may not claim. Perhaps the authors of these faux bills should reimburse the state from their campaign funds.

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avejoeconSep. 10, 13 9:21 AM

Introducing a bill initiates a cost to the state far higher than the special session per diem a legislator may or may not claim. Perhaps the authors of these faux bills should reimburse the state from their campaign funds.-----------There is NO additional costs, stop with the hysteria!!!

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sanddogsnarlSep. 10, 1311:28 AM

"That did not stop legislators from introducing “message bills” restating the desire of GOP members to repeal new taxes on warehouse services, commercial equipment repair and telecommunications equipment..."

A typical bill for the GOP, "message" or not, generally takes the form of twisted contortion wherein they endeavor to combine their two most favored legislative actions: sticking their heads in the sand and kicking the can down the road.

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checkfactsSep. 10, 13 1:13 PM

Administrative, legal, tracking, printing and IT costs to introduce a bill is well known to be an average of about $2,000 each. Bills introduced for a restricted special session are killed when the session adjourns, such bills are primarily for campaign publicity.

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