Minnesota praised for end-of-life care for cancer patients

  • Article by: Jeremy Olson , Star Tribune
  • Updated: September 4, 2013 - 10:15 PM

Minnesota hospitals are more likely to provide timely hospice, withhold futile care for dying patients, Dartmouth analysis finds.

  • 1
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 1 of 1
jdesmondSep. 5, 13 8:58 AM

I appreciate your article on Hospice care. After six years as a hospice volunteer,I've been surprised at the number of people who miss out on great care because they wait too long to sign on to hospice. I don't think doctors are fully to blame, as implied in your article. I think there are other reasons, too. For one thing, people think hospice is a death sentence. Hospice care is recommended when a treatment or cure is no longer a possibility, and so it becomes a part of the process of dying. However, many people find relief when harsh therapies end and palliative or comfort care begins, and they may live longer than expected. It's okay for a person change to change his or her mind. If a patient starts hospice care and either improves (it happens) or decides to pursue treatment again (it happens), he or she can disengage from hospice care and come back to it later on. A life won't be lengthened or shortened due to hospice care, but quality of life is almost always improved.

3
0
  • 1 - 1 of 1

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT