Kansas to require able-bodied adults with no children to work before getting food stamps

  • Article by: ROXANA HEGEMAN , Associated Press
  • Updated: September 4, 2013 - 6:40 PM

WICHITA, Kan. — A federal waiver that allowed about 20,000 unemployed Kansas residents to receive food assistance will be allowed to expire at the end of the month, state officials announced Wednesday, saying they wanted to encourage work over welfare dependency.

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jpcooperSep. 4, 13 1:12 PM

All 50 states should take on this common sense approach!

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windigolakeSep. 4, 13 2:10 PM

jpcooper: "All 50 states should take on this common sense approach!" If you think you can live on what food stamps provide, you are clueless. Food stamps are to keep needy people and their children from starving. That seems like something even the right could support. Guess not!

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Thenry8999Sep. 4, 13 2:45 PM

windigolake "Food stamps are to keep needy people and their children from starving. That seems like something even the right could support. Guess not!" Did you even read the article. It says this would only affect childless adults (so no children will go starving) and those single adults that refuse to work 20 hours a week. If you want your food stamps go be productive for 20 hours a week at McDonalds. That is really not too much to ask. The entitlement attitude in this country is unbelievable.

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peoplewatchrSep. 4, 13 2:48 PM

Kansas is looking to the not so distance future known as bankruptcy. Look at Detroit, Chicago and a number of big cities in CA. They are all close to or are going through bankruptcy because of all the entitlements being handed out. Time to start controlling spending and this is one of many steps needed.

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milkman53Sep. 4, 13 3:03 PM

So someone can work 20 hours a week at say, Wal-Mart for minimum wage, get food stamps and spend the rest of the time playing video games. One wonders if the work requirement doesn't have the effect of holding down wages for those who would work more than 20.

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avejoeconSep. 4, 13 3:59 PM

If you think you can live on what food stamps provide, you are clueless. Food stamps are to keep needy people and their children from starving. That seems like something even the right could support. Guess not!-----------No, you can't live on food stamps, but you can live on food stamps, welfare, WIC, and dozens of other programs that the "poor" recieve. It is estimated that if you add up all the gov't money you get, the "poorest" people bring home about 56,000 per year. All tax free

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IHATELOGINS0Sep. 4, 13 4:08 PM

This is for childless adults only. Reading and comprehension goes a long way. I work 13 hr days, so that is like working a day and half a week and still be eligible, I don't see a problem here.

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guessagainSep. 4, 13 5:24 PM

avejocon === "but you can live on food stamps, welfare, WIC, and dozens of other programs that the "poor" recieve. It is estimated that if you add up all the gov't money you get, the "poorest" people bring home about 56,000 per year. All tax free" Baloney. I love that "it is estimated...." Estimations by the Washington Times, Fox News and you. If it's so great, why don't you give it a try?

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denialoSep. 4, 13 5:24 PM

This is madness! You mean people that are able to work have to actually work to get free money from people like me? Insane! When will it end?

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dogmanSep. 4, 13 5:33 PM

"Did you even read the article. It says this would only affect childless adults (so no children will go starving) and those single adults that refuse to work 20 hours a week." -- Did you even read the article? It said able-bodied adults with no dependents have to find a job or enroll in a job training program. I did see anything about 'refusing' to work having been mentioned. ________ "I work 13 hr days, so that is like working a day and half a week and still be eligible, I don't see a problem here." -- maybe you'd be willing to job share a day and a half per week with someone who can't find a job, then?

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