Food makers' health claims are hard to swallow

  • Article by: Los Angeles Times Editorial
  • Updated: September 4, 2013 - 10:52 AM

A few years ago, Kellogg Co. embarked on an ad campaign to convince parents that eating Frosted Mini-Wheats cereal would make star students of their children, with higher levels of attention and memory. “Clinical studies” - a revered term - showed that a breakfast of the cereal improved children’s attentiveness by “nearly 20 percent,” the ads said.

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luzhishenSep. 4, 1311:08 AM

The better idea: no health claims whatsoever allowed in packaging and advertising.

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davehougSep. 4, 1311:47 AM

Companies will do what government lets them. They constantly push against the limit to see what the limit is. No action = more claims.

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dhenkelsSep. 4, 1311:48 AM

And to add to what luzhishen said, also include all information of what is truly contained in that food. Don't hide transfats behind some other label, sugar products in another name etc... and let us know what is gentically modified and what isn't. Is it too much to ask for reality of what is in our food?

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eman2001Sep. 4, 13 1:55 PM

I recently bought Honey-Nut Cheerios for the grandkids. An infinitesimal amount of honey actually in the product and no nuts.

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erikj3Sep. 4, 13 1:58 PM

"Americans are searching food shelves these days for fountains of youth and antidotes to disease."...It's called not eating the typical American diet.

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sunnyboySep. 4, 13 1:59 PM

Oatmeal :)

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elind56Sep. 4, 13 2:51 PM

sunnyboy said: "Oatmeal :)"-------------------------I USED to enjoy instant oatmeal on a fairly regular basis...until they did something to it a couple years ago to make it fiberier (that a word?) or something. Now it's sawdust-meal and nobody in my house will touch it anymore.

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adammynafzigSep. 4, 13 3:07 PM

It's simple, really: if the ingredient dec wouldn't match the one you'd write if you made it in your own kitchen, don't buy it. If you can't even make it in your own kitchen, it isn't food.

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scubadoo68Sep. 4, 13 3:19 PM

If it sounds to good to be true, then it probably is.

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tomtom02Sep. 4, 1311:29 PM

From the article: "Another ad offered the hopeful message: Death is so dead. ... Pom Wonderful has more antioxidants than any other drink and can help prevent premature aging, heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s, even cancer.” It just goes to show you, there are STILL plenty of consumers in North America willing to buy snake oil!

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