For animals, a better way of life

  • Article by: Jeff Johnson
  • Updated: August 31, 2013 - 7:56 AM

I was delighted to see a recent article about Farm Sanctuary in upstate New York (“NY sanctuaries take in animals escaping urban slaughterhouses,” StarTribune.com). My first visit to Farm Sanctuary was earlier this summer.

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jload027Aug. 30, 13 8:18 PM

Way to go, Jeff! I am in complete agreement. Some animals may not be able to be on the planet that long but they can at least have decent conditions and quality of life while they are here.

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gemie1Aug. 30, 13 8:36 PM

The way we treat animals says what kind of society and people we are. Animals should be able to roam and live their lives the way nature intended. I remember about 12 years ago, I was in Ireland during the mad cow disease problem in England. The people in Ireland were not concerned about their live stock, because they were allowed to graze and were not fed back their own species. We should not be consuming as much meat as we do. We have a health problem in this country with heart, high cholesterol and blood pressure. It is healthier for us and the animal to let them live the way nature intended and not do assembly line breeding. I just want to say that my cholesterol was 270 and I took out dairy and red meat and it is now at 198.

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didwiddelerAug. 30, 13 9:13 PM

When you start naming hogs, I know you're nuts.

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rlwr51Aug. 30, 1310:52 PM

This is what we get when money is our God.

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bgronniAug. 31, 13 6:09 AM

If the average person treated their pets like the factory farms treat their animals, the average person would be arrested for animal cruelty.

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owatonnabillAug. 31, 13 8:29 AM

This is a story along the lines of "Teacher talks gunman into surrendering". We might get all warm and fuzzy but the reality is that that most of our pork does not come from farms that look like they belong on a Swiss postcard where happy little piggies spend their days romping through idyllic meadows with garlands of flowers wrapped around their ears. If your name is Hormel and you produce part of the 22.8 billion pounds of pork that Americans consume annually, neither economics nor space would permit it. These critters are PRODUCT and go from farrowing pen to slaughterhouse in the way that ensures the most meat in the quickest manner. This precludes wanton abuse--who in their right mind is going to treat critters in any way BUT that which guarantees the best return on investment, so (with of course the occasional exception) they're not whipped, abused, starved, etc. You may not agree with how their lives are managed but that's the way it is and that's the way it will stay, feelgood stories like this one notwithstanding.

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rjgronesAug. 31, 13 9:27 AM

Hey owatonnabill.. thanks for taking time out of your busy day to grace us all with your grand transcendent wisdom. But the harvesting of living things for food on an industrial scale will end. It's completely immoral, but apart from that it's end is simply inevitable because it's unsustainable. You can bet the farm on it mate..

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tinknalAug. 31, 13 9:56 AM

rjgrones, there are 7 billion people on this planet. How do you propose we feed them? Have you ever even been on a farm or feedlot? I have. I have a little secret for you. Animals that are abused and stressed do not grow or reproduce well. They just don't. This is why farm owners do everything they can to insure the safty and comfort of their animals. Oh, and one little note for the author of this screed, a hog's gestation doesn't even last 4 months. LOL!

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pumiceAug. 31, 1310:37 AM

Re: "This is why farm owners do everything they can to insure the safty [sic] and comfort of their animals." From Wiki: "A gestation crate, also known as a sow stall, is a metal enclosure used in intensive pig farming, in which a female breeding pig (sow) may be kept during pregnancy, and in effect for most of her adult life. The enclosures measure 6.6 ft x 2.0 ft ... The floors of the crates are made of concrete, and are slatted to allow waste to be collected below. As the sows outgrow the crates, they must sleep on their chests, unable to turn around. A few days before giving birth, they are moved to farrowing crates, where they are able to lie down to nurse while being held apart from their piglets."

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dannybillAug. 31, 1310:49 AM

Excellent essay! I also suggest readers check out the book "Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism" for insights into why a small subset of animal types are used for food, milk, fabric, etc. Vegans have proven for many decades that this is not necessary.

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