A millennial's perspective on the 'boomerang generation'

  • Article by: Emily Cain , Special to the Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 27, 2013 - 3:35 PM

ESSAY: A St. Paul freelance writer — who also happens to be a boomerang kid and card-carrying millennial — sings the virtues of rooming with Mom.

  • 10
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 10 of 10
mccovey69Aug. 28, 13 8:07 AM

Is this supposed to be amusing? It isn't. The tone is selfish and disrespectful--not cute and funny. I can't believe the line "if you are lucky enough to just have one parent"--that has to be an attempt at humor, right? It seems this author thinks it is great to take advantage of all the parent has worked for while despising the work, such as keeping up a house. If this article was meant to be humorous, it failed, and if it is for real, it is utterly selfish.

6
4
deuce82Aug. 28, 13 8:58 AM

Way to dream big! You don't seem to want to act like an adult, it's amazing that anyone would ever treat you like one and take you seriously. Reality check: eventually we all need to grow up and take care of ourselves. I boomeranged myself and you better believe that arrangement ended as soon as I could make it happen.

5
4
antihateAug. 28, 1312:09 PM

Great satire is often underappreciated.

5
1
red0612Aug. 28, 1312:37 PM

I'd sure like to hear "Mom's" side of the story.

8
1
crberg8888Aug. 28, 13 6:07 PM

If this is supposed to be satire, it's poorly delivered. Effective satire actually reveals the societal vice held up for scorn at some point. Or maybe you did that in the opening dig at Italian men or when you mocked those of us who apparently waste our time maintaining our "investments". The closing bit about the bad economy rendering members of your generation over-educated and underemployed just comes off as simple whining. If this was serious, then hats-off to you for reinforcing the narcissistic stereotype for the millennial generation. Honestly, the self-absorption of this crowd makes us Gen-Xers look saintly. Not one word in this thing about what benefits, even simple companionship, Mom gets from this arrangement.

3
4
SeaSharkAug. 28, 13 8:20 PM

EMILY CAIN, perhaps unintentionally, portrays herself as a flighty, entitled, immature freeloader in this ill-conceived failed attempt at humor. Cain's astonishing household sharing observation--"Maybe it's different if you have two parents. But if you're lucky enough to just have one parent, then really all you're contending with is a roommate"--is incredibly callous. Cain may imagine herself to be the reincarnation of Dorothy Parker but she's not; Parker had style and wit. The Variety section editors who approved publication of this frivolous flippant article made an error in judgment.

2
4
PamelaHaaseAug. 29, 13 5:25 PM

OK, another affirmation of my unending bliss that I never had a child. As a second year boomer, let me first say I don't have a parrot tunic nor I go to Florida. I am still reaching my peak time of day when Craig Ferguson is ending. Were I to have Ms. Cain as a daughter, I would throw her and her stuff out of my house and out of my will. I would see an attorney and bill her for past rent. Then I would change my locks.

0
2
liora51Aug. 30, 13 5:52 AM

Oh for heaven's sake. The author's mother probably enjoyed the piece and most likely enjoys having her daughter around. It's called having a family.

3
0
saintpaulgalAug. 30, 13 9:09 PM

I enjoyed this light-hearted piece. Ya'll need to lighten up a bit.

2
0
Sunny&BrightSep. 7, 1310:01 AM

I thought it was funny and cute -- and I'm a 50 year old married woman, with an adult son still living at home.

0
0
  • 1 - 10 of 10

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: What's your favorite Easter candy?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT